transfer

(redirected from transferability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

transfer

 [trans´fer]
1. the taking or moving of something from one place to another.
2. the moving of a patient from one surface to another. Patients can be taught to transfer safely either independently or with minimal assistance if they can balance in a sitting position.
gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) a type of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by placement of oocytes and sperm in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy.
Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT). Multiple ova and washed sperm are injected into the fallopian tube, where fertilization may occur. From McKinney et al., 2000.
passive transfer the conferring of immunity to a nonimmune host by injection of antibody or lymphocytes from an immune or sensitized donor.
sliding board transfer a method of transferring a patient: a smooth tapered board is placed under the patient and stabilized on the surface to which movement will take place so that the patient can glide across.
tendon transfer surgical relocation of the insertion of a tendon of a normal muscle to another site to take over the function of another muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.
tubal embryo transfer (TET)
1. a method of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by their fertilization and culture in the laboratory with placement of the resulting embryos in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy more than 24 hours after the original retrieval.
2. laparoscopic transfer of cryopreserved embryos to the fallopian tubes.
zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) a type of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by their fertilization and culture in the laboratory and the placement of the resulting zygotes in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy 24 hours after the original retrieval.

trans·fer

(trans'fĕr),
1. Process of removal or transferral.
2. A condition in which learning in one situation influences learning in another situation; a carry-over of learning that may be positive in effect, as when learning one behavior facilitates the learning of something else, or may be negative, as when one habit interferes with the acquisition of a later one.
Synonym(s): transmission (1)
[L. trans-fero, to bear across]

transfer

/trans·fer/ (trans´fer) the taking or moving of something from one place to another.
gamete intrafallopian transfer  (GIFT) retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by laparoscopic placement of the oocytes and sperm in the fallopian tubes; used in the treatment of infertility.
passive transfer  the conferring of immunity to a nonimmune host by injection of antibody or lymphocytes from an immune or sensitized donor.
tubal embryo transfer  (TET)
1. retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, fertilization and culture in vitro, then laparoscopic placement of resulting embryos in the fallopian tubes more than 24 hours after oocyte retrieval; used in the treatment of infertility.
2. laparoscopic transfer of cryopreserved embryos to the fallopian tubes.
zygote intrafallopian transfer  (ZIFT) retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, fertilization and culture in vitro, then laparoscopic placement of the resulting zygotes in the fallopian tubes 24 hours after oocyte retrieval; used in the treatment of infertility.

transfer1

to move a person or object from one site to another.

transfer2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as moving a patient with limitation of independent movement. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

transfer

Medspeak
noun
(1) A popular term for a patient whose care has been passed from one service to another.
(2) The changing of a thing’s position in relationship to others.

verb To pass the care of a patient from one service or ward to another.
 
Medspeak-UK
When the care of an individual is passed from one professional to another and/or one agency to another and/or one location to another.
 
Psychiatry
noun A neurologic equivalent applied to a time, place, or situation other than the way in which the equivalent was initially learned.
 
Reproduction medicine
noun The moving of a fertilised egg or more advanced reproductive product from one environment to another which is more suitable for long-term survival.

transfer

Medtalk noun
1. A popular term for a Pt whose care has been passed from one service to another.
2. The changing of a thing's position with relationship to others. See Blastocyst transfer, Egg transfer, Electron transfer, Electronic funds transfer, Embryo transfer, Gamete intrafallopian transfer, Gene transfer, Linear transfer, Microvascular free toe transfer, Somatic-cell nuclear transfer, Zygote intrafallopian transfer verbTo pass the care of a Pt from one service or ward to another.

trans·fer

(trans'fĕr)
1. Process of removal or change of place.
2. A condition in which learning in one situation influences learning in another situation; a carryover of learning that may be positive in effect, as when learning one behavior facilitates the learning of something else, or may be negative, as when one habit interferes with the acquisition of a later one.
Synonym(s): transmission (1) .
3. In physical therapy, movement of a patient from one surface (e.g., bed, chair) to another.
[L. trans-fero, to bear across]

transfer,

n See energy exchange.

Patient discussion about transfer

Q. can hepatitis be transferred from fathers sperm when concieving a child? My partner has hepatitis C and he has gotten me pregnant will our baby have it too?

A. Here is taken from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hepatitis_C#Transmission) :

Sexual transmission of HCV is considered to be rare. Studies show the risk of sexual transmission in heterosexual, monogamous relationships is extremely rare or even null. The CDC does not recommend the use of condoms between long-term monogamous discordant couples (where one partner is positive and the other is negative). However, because of the high prevalence of hepatitis C, this small risk may translate into a non-trivial number of cases transmitted by sexual routes. Vaginal penetrative sex is believed to have a lower risk of transmission than sexual practices that involve higher levels of trauma to anogenital mucosa.

Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C has been well described, but occurs relatively infrequently. Transmission occurs only among women who are HCV RNA positive at the time of delivery; the risk of transmission in this setting is approximately 6 out of 100. Among women w

More discussions about transfer
References in periodicals archive ?
7701-2(e) provides that the modified form of free transferability exists if member interests must first be offered to other members (at fair market value) before being transferred to any nonmember.
The rationale for this exploratory classroom study was to find ways to encourage adult students to articulate and share their work and life experience and to explore the transferability of classroom learning to other social roles they assume in their communities.
Floyd Prozanski, D-Eugene, said he heard from several rural constituents worried that the transferability language would lead to the development of mini-ranches next-door to their farmings.
AG/E also uses this analytical approach to calculate the discount for lack of free transferability when valuing unregistered privately placed shares of common stock.
One of the remaining two characteristics, free transferability of interests, does not exist unless "members owning substantially all of the interests in the organization have the power" to transfer their interests.
The Department of Defense has specific concerns about legislation sponsored by Senator Webb because it lacks transferability and could negatively impact military retention.
Ministers are expected to do away with the transferability of pension rights and to keep only two chapters of the text: access for new arrivals to supplementary pension rights and the fair treatment of dormant pension rights (see Europolitics 3274).
A major challenge is to ensure continuing and efficient student mobility and transferability of credits across this broad array of institutions with changing mandates.
To engage the students in group discussions and active learning to foster the transferability of the knowledge gained.
83-3(h), a restriction which, by its terms, will never lapse (nonlapse restriction) is a permanent limit on the transferability of property that will (1) require the transferee to sell (or offer to sell) the property at a price determined under a formula and (2) continue to apply and be enforced against the transferee or any subsequent holder (other than the transferor).
All four corporate characteristics - limited liability, continuity of life, free transferability of interest and centralization of management - are integral to the operation and management of a large, public corporation, and it's unlikely that large corporations would sacrifice any two traits to obtain the tax benefits to be derived from an LLC.
Accordingly, LLCs must avoid continuity of life and free transferability of interests to achieve partnership status.