transfection

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trans·fec·tion

(trans-fek'shŭn),
A method of gene transfer using infection of a cell with nucleic acid (as from a retrovirus) resulting in subsequent viral replication in the transfected cell.
[trans- + infection]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

transfection

(trăns-fĕk′shən)
n.
Introduction of a segment of DNA or RNA into a eukaryotic cell by means of one of a variety of physical or chemical methods or through viral infection.

trans·fect′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trans·fec·tion

(trans-fek'shŭn)
A method of gene transfer using infection of a cell with nucleic acid (as from a retrovirus) resulting in subsequent viral replication in the transfected cell.
[trans- + infection]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

transfection

Gene transfer by infection of a cell with nucleic acid by a virus, followed by viral replication in the affected cell.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

transfection

a method of introducing the purified DNA of a VIRUS into CELLS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

trans·fec·tion

(trans-fek'shŭn)
A method of gene transfer using infection of a cell with nucleic acid (as from a retrovirus) resulting in subsequent viral replication in the transfected cell.
[trans- + infection]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
ST cells were plated on 24-well plates for 24 h before transfection. miR-375 mimics plasmids (1 [micro]g) containing the RLFWT (1 [micro]g), HIGD1A-WT (1 [micro]g), RLF-MUT (1 [micro]g), HIGD1AMUT (1 [micro]g) genes or luciferase vector (pmiR-RB-Report) (1 [micro]g) were co-transfected with 2 [micro]L of FuGENE HD (Roche, Switzerland) in triplicate for 36 h.
SW-480/OR cells with different transfections were incubated with different doses of oxaliplatin for 24 h, followed by cell viability assay (B) and apoptosis evaluation (C).
Nowadays, Mirus Bio is the leading manufacturer of transfection reagents for chemical and/or electroporation delivery of DNA, RNA, siRNA, miRNA, and other nucleic acids.
To date, two approaches have been described to investigate the activity of PPAR[gamma], based on (i) cell transfection with a nonsecreted luciferase reporter gene (transiently in cells of interest [17] or stably using cell lines [18]) and (ii) a humanized in vivo reporter model (Xenopus laevis [19]).
Several studies have shown the ability of CPPs to enhance polymer-mediated transfection in cell culture [15].
Methods: In transfection efficiency optimization experiments, different starting cell densities, different amounts of plasmid DNA and PEI transfection reagent were investigated to achieve the best conditions leading to maximum transfection efficiencies.
In vivo magnetic fields are focused under the site required to promote the transfection and also to carry the therapeutic gene to an organ or a specific site within the body, offering the possibility to develop more efficient and less invasive therapy.
To assess the effect of transfection on mammalian cells, 293 cells obtained from the RIKEN Cell Bank (Tsukuba, Japan) and normal rat bone marrow cells obtained from the TAKARA BIO Japan were used.
A 5 | g transfection of a GFP-expressing plasmid served as a negative control.
In a trial using CMV-LUC (4 [micro]L of 500 ng DNA/pL; n = 5), approximately 80-90% of the total brain luciferase activity was found in the telencephalon and optic tectum, whereas the hypothalamus and cerebellum plus hindbrain had very low levels of transfection (data not shown).
HEK 293T cells are commonly used for lentivirus production due to high transfection efficiencies and protein expression levels; however, the lentivirus platform is often limited by insufficient viral titers requiring concentration before use.