self-transcendence

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self-transcendence

the ability to focus attention on doing something for the sake of others, as opposed to self-actualization, in which doing something for oneself is an end goal. See also altruism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The not-so-gradual displacement of transcendentalism in Emerson's prose works could, in some instances, be interpreted as a return of the repressed.
For Newfield, Emerson's transcendentalism provides a politically expedient alternative to socialist, communist, and other collective forms of social agency being tested politically and theoretically in the nineteenth century.
Transcendentalism finds the source for the law's authority outside and above the law itself and is usually juxtaposed against legal positivism.
It was the last great bastion of Transcendentalism, a school of philosophy and art for Emersonians and Whitmanites; it was a New Thought proving ground for such leaders as Ralph Waldo Trine, Henry Wood, and Horatio Dresser; it was a hub for representatives of the Society of Ethical Culture, Theosophy, Buddhism, Reform Judaism, Vedanta, Zoroastrianism, Islam, and the Baha'i Faith.
While Delano discusses Unitarianism, Transcendentalism, Associationism, and Fourierism, he does not explore the way in which these ideas, and not mundane misfortunes, were the true source of Brook Farm's ultimate demise.
Both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, titans of 19th-century American transcendentalism, loved it.
Walden," B-: "Hooray" for Henry David Thoreau and transcendentalism, but "boo" for wordiness.
In 1996 he was the editor of the Biographical Dictionary of Transcendentalism (designated an Outstanding Academic Book of the year) and the Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism.
The second great wave after that was Transcendentalism, which was an attempted reclaiming of a sense of the sacred.
Stedingh thus stresses the craftsmanship in Viirlaid's poetry, whose main philosophical line he defines as "pantheistic transcendentalism.
With this kindly gesture" Lewis writes, "Emerson opened for Furness the same window onto the universe that he celebrated in his famous essay `On Nature' the most exquisite statement of New England transcendentalism, the belief that the entire natural world is the physical manifestation of the Godhead.
In Tolstoy closing his realistic novel with Levin experiencing a very transcendental enlightenment, he suggests that Transcendentalism may not be confined to idealism.