transcendence


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transcendence

[transen′dəns]
Etymology: L, trans + scandere, to climb
the rising above one's previously perceived limits or restrictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of these thinkers recognizes in his own way that the misconceived transcendence and the concomitant confusion about the relation between theory and practice characterize the source of modernity's problems, but Hancock distinguishes Tocqueville as the one who reasons most responsibly.
Coming first in the Self Transcendence 24 Hour race has been surreal.
Liberty for Pareyson is above all an experience of transcendence, and the existential experience of transcendence is above all liberty.
In the final three chapters he explores the European cinema of redemption through an extended analysis of sexual ethics in Philip Kaufman's The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988), the failure and frustration of redemption in Federico Fellini's La dolce vita (1960), and the triumph of the feminine through ethical transcendence and embodied sexual love in Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Avventura (1960).
The two senses of transcendence relevant to the poetry of Rilke and Stevens might be characterized as "other-worldly" transcendence and "this-worldly" transcendence, or a transcendence immanent to a world we can experience or imagine.
Yet there is a deeper problem--a problem that is, perhaps, the central issue of Henry's philosophical works: namely, in raising transcendence to the level of universal category, one neglects the primacy of immanence.
He further suggests that this should be viewed as exteriorization, providing space for transcendence in the realm of language.
Argument from transcendence is an elusive but essential form of persuasion (Jasinski, 2001).
The scanty citations of transcendence are spread sparingly in Being and Time.
Panentheism (all in God), which includes distorted views of God's immanence and transcendence (Fox believes that God changes), is indeed distinct from pantheism (all is God), which merges God's immanence with his creation into one.
From the recurrence of trinities the Jesus/Osiris and Mary/Isis connections and Akhenaten's early form of monotheism, The Egyptian Origin of Christianity discusses remarkable transcendence of theological and mythological concepts in plain terms, accessible to readers of all backgrounds.