transamination


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Related to transamination: deamination, Oxidative deamination

transamination

 [trans″am-ĭ-na´shun]
the reversible exchange of amino groups between different amino acids.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

trans·am·i·na·tion

(trans'am-i-nā'shŭn),
The reaction between an amino acid and an α-keto acid through which the amino group is transferred from the former to the latter; in certain cases the reaction may be between an amino acid and an aldehyde (for example, glutamate with glutamate semialdehyde via ornithine transaminase).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

transamination

(trăns-ăm′ə-nā′shən, trănz-)
n.
1. Transfer of an amino group from one chemical compound to another.
2. Transposition of an amino group within a chemical compound.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

transamination

Chemistry
A biochemical reaction in which an amino group is transferred from an amino acid—which becomes an alpha-keto acid upon losing the amino group—to an alpha-keto acid—which becomes an amino acid once it gains the transferred amino group.
 
Medspeak
A near-extinct term for:
(1) Resuscitation of a stillborn infant;
(2) Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

trans·am·i·na·tion

(tranz'am-i-nā'shŭn)
The reaction between an amino acid and an α-keto acid through which the amino group is transferred from the former to the latter.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

transamination

The reaction in which the amino group of an amino acid is transferred to a ketoacid, converting it into an amino acid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Transaminationclick for a larger image
Fig. 300 Transamination . The transfer of an amino group to form a different amino acid.

transamination

the process by which amino groups are transferred from one AMINO ACID to form another, using a keto acid as an intermediary. The mechanism takes place in the liver, and is important in the breakdown of excess amino acids to form keto acids and in the formation of new amino acids (perhaps not available in the diet) from keto acids. An example is shown in Fig. 300. ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS cannot be produced by transamination.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

trans·am·i·na·tion

(tranz'am-i-nā'shŭn)
The reaction between an amino acid and an α-keto acid through which the amino group is transferred from the former to the latter.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Reactions with gaseous products as dehydrogenation and transamination may thus be limited in the presence of DCPO.
The amino groups of glutamic acid are allocated through transamination reactions to form other amino acids necessary for protein synthesis and other compounds (Noctor et al., 2002).
She, "Transamination is required for [alpha]-ketoisocaproate but not leucine to stimulate insulin secretion," Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Aminotransferases are localized in periportal hepatocytes where they are involved in amino acid metabolism; transamination reactions and their serum activities presumably increase as a result of cellular membrane damage and leakage [32].
Hence POR is involved in the fermentation of both sugars and peptides (pyruvate is the product of alanine transamination), while IOR, KGOR, and VOR function only in peptide fermentation.
For example, nicotinamide is essential for carbohydrate metabolism and for nonredox adenosine diphosphate-ribose transfer reactions involved in DNA repair, while pyridoxine plays an essential role in amino acid transamination and riboflavin functions as a coenzyme for a wide variety of respiratory enzymes [3].
Thus, the altered levels of pyruvate, alanine, and glutamate (Figure 5) might reflect disorders of transamination and could be used as an index of disturbance in amino acid metabolism caused by SH and SC.
Firstly, by degradation through transamination pathway producing aketoisocaproate, a metabolite which is a potent secretagogue allowing stimulation of insulin secretion through subsequent mitochondrial oxidation.
Normally, these enzymes are present in the liver and other tissues where they function in energy metabolism involving the transamination of amino acids.
This enhancement in the activity is also rationalized due to presence of azomethine (C=N) group; this imports in elucidating the mechanism of transamination and resamination reactions in biological system.
(1972), and Carpinelli and Malaisse (1981), L-Leucine induces insulin secretion by two mechanisms: (i) enhanced mitochondrial metabolic activity through activation of glutamate dehydrogenase, and (ii) by transamination to [alpha]-ketoisocaproate and subsequent entry into the TCA cycle via acetyl-CoA leading to an increase in ATP production.
Aspartate, produced from oxaloacetate (by transamination), is another neurotransmitter that stimulates N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, the predominant molecule that controls synaptic plasticity and memory function.