trans fatty acids


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Related to trans fatty acids: LDL, Triglycerides, Omega 3

stealth fat

Nutrition
A nonspecific term that has been used for:
(1) A fat (bisphenol A) that does not appear on food nutrition labels and which may impact upon weight gain.
(2) Body fat that accumulates when people underestimate the amount of food that they are eating—e.g., from snacking, bits of leftovers on plates in family meals, various juices and low- (but not no-) calorie foods and beverages.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

trans fatty acids

Unsaturated fatty acids with at least one double bond in the TRANS configuration. They are formed during partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils in the manufacture of margarines. Trans fatty acids promote inflammation and increase activity of the tumour necrosis factor in obese women. A daily intake of about five grams of trans fat is believed to be associated with a 25 percent in crease in the risk of coronary artery disease. In the USA the FDA now (2006) requires food labelling to include content of trans fatty acids.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
[ClickPress, Thu Jun 20 2019] Among the several regions, Asia Pacific can be considered with the highest production and consumption of trans fatty acids. Countries such as China, India and Malaysia are expected to cover most of the market share for trans fatty acids.
WHO guidelines suggest using polyunsaturated (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) as a replacement for TFA or trans fatty acids. Oils rich in PUFAs include safflower oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, fatty fishes like salmon and tuna, walnuts, chia seeds, and other seeds.
Trans fatty acids. Most of trans fatty acids enter in body through the intake of partially hydrogenated fats.
Willett, "Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
Manson et al., "Intake of trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease among women," The Lancet, vol.
Mozaffarian, "Trends in trans fatty acids reformulations of US supermarket and brand-name foods from 2007 through 2011," Preventing chronic disease, vol.
Hydrogenation alternatives: effects of trans fatty acids and stearic acid versus linoleic on serum lipids and lipoproteins in humans.
Nutritional information indicated 5 g of total lipid content, 3.6 g of monounsaturated fatty acids, 0.7 g of polyunsaturated fatty acids, 0.7 g of saturated fatty acids and 0 g of trans fatty acids.
Instead, the new recommendation is to emphasize the use of healthful fats (such as olive oil and nuts), while avoiding harmful fats (such as trans fatty acids).
BANNING trans fatty acids in Britain would save lives, according to new research.
The practice of repeated deep frying in the same oil at the commercial food outlets causes high accumulation of Trans fatty acids and other carcinogenic by products.