trans fatty acids


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Related to trans fatty acids: LDL, Triglycerides, Omega 3

stealth fat

Nutrition
A nonspecific term that has been used for:
(1) A fat (bisphenol A) that does not appear on food nutrition labels and which may impact upon weight gain.
(2) Body fat that accumulates when people underestimate the amount of food that they are eating—e.g., from snacking, bits of leftovers on plates in family meals, various juices and low- (but not no-) calorie foods and beverages.

trans fatty acids

Unsaturated fatty acids with at least one double bond in the TRANS configuration. They are formed during partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils in the manufacture of margarines. Trans fatty acids promote inflammation and increase activity of the tumour necrosis factor in obese women. A daily intake of about five grams of trans fat is believed to be associated with a 25 percent in crease in the risk of coronary artery disease. In the USA the FDA now (2006) requires food labelling to include content of trans fatty acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, an editorial In the New England Journal of Medicine In 2014 about trans fatty acids stated, "In the early 1990s, studies began [Italics mine] revealing negative health effects of trans fats, and by the mid-20005, It was clear beyond doubt that trans fats Increase the risk of coronary heart disease.
New research suggests that low levels of trans fatty acids (TFAs) may not be as harmful to human health as previously thought, even if industrially produced, and may even be beneficial if they occur naturally in foods such as dairy and meat products.
They said: "A total ban on trans fatty acids in processed foods might prevent or postpone about 7,200 deaths from coronary heart disease from 2015-20 and reduce inequality in mortality from coronary heart disease by about 3,000 deaths.
Dietary trans fatty acids are primarily products of hydrogenation, which makes unsaturated oils solid at room temperature.
6) In order for a food product to be labelled "low in saturated fats", it must contain 2 g or less of a combination of saturated and trans fatty acids per serving (or per 100 g for pre-packaged meals) and it provides 15% or less energy from the sum of saturated and trans fatty acid.
Removing industrial trans fatty acids is one of the most straightforward public health strategies for rapid improvements in health," they said.
Concern about trans fatty acids is causing food manufacturers to seek alternative frying oils that have a similar oxidative stability to hydrogenated fats.
Reports published in a recent issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology reveal a protective effect for omega-3 fatty acids, fish, nuts, and olive oil, and an adverse effect for trans fatty acids, on the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration.
And both trans fatty acids and saturated fatty acids are associated with elevated risk, according to authors of an ARS-supported study.
The ratio of trans fatty acids (TFAs) to omega-3 fatty acids has been shown in several studies to have altered to favour TFAs, specifically trans-9 18:1 and trans-10 18:1 fatty acids.
Although we did not find a significant association between the class of total trans fatty acids and the MetS, we did find a significant inverse association (P <0.
Professor Arne Astrup, Royal Veterinary & Agricultural University, Denmark - Nutrition and colon cancer - beyond dietary fibre Dr Maria Pufulete, Kings College London, UK - Trans fatty acids and health - are all 'trans' bad?