trans fat


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trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
Artificial trans fat is also referred to as industrial trans fat and partially hydrogenated fat.
The report, which was presented in response to members of the House's questions about the government's action to eliminate margarine and vegetable ghee, said that trans fat is considered to be the worst type of fat one can eat.
"We have been reducing our use of trans fats for years and remain committed to doing so in an effort to promote heart health."
"Eliminating industrially-produced trans fat is one of the simplest and most effective ways to save lives and create a healthier food supply," he added.
Trans fat, PHVO, or Partially Hydrogenated Oils (PHO) is found in margarine, vegetable shortening, ghee (clarified butter from India), fried food (especially those in fast food joints), doughnuts, baked goods (crackers, biscuits, and cookie), snacks, pies, and pre-mixed products (pancake and hot chocolate mixes).
Trans fats, however, elevate bad cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein or LDL) levels and lower good cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein or HDL) levels in humans, enhancing risks of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes and stroke.
"It is highly recommended to choose zero gram trans fats foods with no hydrogenated oil in the ingredients list," said Rayan Saleh, dietician from the Department of Clinical Nutrition, Burjeel Hospital for Advanced Surgery, Dubai.
WHO recommends that the total trans fat intake be limited to less than 1 percent of total energy intake, which translates to less than 2.2 g/day with a 2,000-calorie diet.
In Denmark, the first country to mandate restrictions on industrially-produced trans fats, the trans-fat content of food products declined dramatically and cardiovascular disease deaths declined more quickly than in comparable OECD countries.
Not only does just a small amount of trans fat raise LDL ("bad") cholesterol, it also lowers HDL ("good") cholesterol.
Q Which is worse for your health, saturated fat or trans fat?

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