trans fat


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trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Tim Chico, a consultant cardiologist at the University of Sheffield, said it was clear that artificially-manufactured trans fats, "whose use only benefits the food industry", increase the risk of heart disease.
In this case, it's far from clear that the FDA's trans fat eliminationism is necessary, even if you're worried about the fats' health effects.
This means that by 2018, we might find food products in supermarket aisles that may be free of trans fats.
This determination will significantly reduce the use of PHOs, the major source of artificial trans fats, in the food supply.
In 2002, the National Academy of Sciences found that trans fats had "no known benefit to human health.
Trans fats are unsaturated fats that are uncommon in nature, but can be created artificially.
subgroups may still be consuming relatively high levels of trans fat and therefore emphasis needs to "continue to be placed on the reduction of trans fat in the diet.
Agency officials say they have been working on trans fat issues for around 15 years and have been collecting data to justify a possible phase-out since just after President Barack Obama came into office in 2009.
Research has shown repeatedly for more than a decade that trans fats are dangerous because they raise LDL levels and can lower levels of HDL, the "good cholesterol.
Dates are shown for each run in Trial 2 to show relative dates when changes in trans fat content were observed.
However, among women who took aspirin over an extended period of time, researchers found no association between trans fat consumption and stroke risk - suggesting that regular aspirin use may counteract trans fat intake's adverse effect on stroke risk among women.
Trans fat also promotes inflammation, resistance to insulin, and obesity, according to The Nutrition Source, a website maintained by Harvard University (www.