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trance

 [trans]
a state of altered consciousness characterized by heightened focal awareness and reduced peripheral awareness; a sleeplike state of reduced consciousness and activity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

TRANCE

(trans),
Abbreviation for tumor necrosis factor-related activation-induced cytokine, which stimulates osteoclast differentiation.
Synonym(s): OPG ligand
[TNF-related activation-induced cytokine]

trance

(trans),
An altered state of consciousness as in hypnosis, catalepsy, or ecstasy.
[L. transeo, to go across]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trance

(trăns)
n.
1. A hypnotic, cataleptic, or ecstatic state.
2. Detachment from one's physical surroundings, as in contemplation or daydreaming.
3. A semiconscious state, as between sleeping and waking; a daze.
tr.v. tranced, trancing, trances
To put into a trance; entrance.

trance′like′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trance

Psychiatry A state of focused attention and diminished sensory and motor activity seen in hypnosis, hysterical neurosis, dissociative types. See Ecstatic religious state, Neurosis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

trance

(trans)
An altered state of consciousness as in hypnosis, catalepsy, or ecstasy.
[L. transeo, to go across]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trance

A state of reduced consciousness with diminished voluntary action. Trances may occur in some forms of EPILEPSY, in CATALEPSY, in HYSTERIA and in HYPNOSIS.

TRANCE

Acronym for tumour-necrosis-factor-related activation-induced cytokine. This cytokine stimulates osteoclast differentiation and offers the possibility of developing new control over bone loss in osteoporosis.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
That was the first time I spoke a foreign language while in a trance. Such a phenomenon is called 'speaking in tongues,' which is one of the gifts of the Holy Spirit, according to St.
On another occasion, while in a trance in the office, I predicted the coming of a big typhoon and asked everybody to prepare for it.
A reclining life-size wooden statue of Christ in Pampanga, called Apo Makalulu, which is considered miraculous by its devotees, put me into a trance while standing near its feet as the devotees were praying before it.
The drummers rhythmically bring the dancer into a trance and the spirits into attendance.
The out-of-body, otherworldly experience of trance provides an oneiric mirror for an alternative view of one's self, subject formation, and reinterpreting identity.
There have been far more historical studies of Mormons than Methodists, perhaps even of the few Shakers than of the millions of Methodists, yet one must ask: who tells more about "fits, trances, and visions" in American religion than a group that generated so many ecstasies and enthusiasms--and then turned out to be so mainstream?
Fits, Trances, & Visions is certain to find its place not only as a sign of new times in historical writing in this area and as a skein of good stories but as a permanent contribution to study of religious experience.
The black and white photographs, liberally interspersed throughout the text, are an integral part of this study and bring to life the participants, whether it is a seer with eyes upturned in divine trance or the public watching in astonishment.
Lewis-Williams asserts that the paintings depict shamans inducing trances, entering the spirit world (either through arc-shaped representations of the blind spot that mars the visual field during the first stage of a trance or through the streaks of paint along the rock face), and becoming man-beasts, considered by the San to be capable of wielding supernatural power.
Rock and cave art may offer insights into shamans' trance states and spiritual sightings