trance

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trance

 [trans]
a state of altered consciousness characterized by heightened focal awareness and reduced peripheral awareness; a sleeplike state of reduced consciousness and activity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

TRANCE

(trans),
Abbreviation for tumor necrosis factor-related activation-induced cytokine, which stimulates osteoclast differentiation.
Synonym(s): OPG ligand
[TNF-related activation-induced cytokine]

trance

(trans),
An altered state of consciousness as in hypnosis, catalepsy, or ecstasy.
[L. transeo, to go across]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trance

(trăns)
n.
1. A hypnotic, cataleptic, or ecstatic state.
2. Detachment from one's physical surroundings, as in contemplation or daydreaming.
3. A semiconscious state, as between sleeping and waking; a daze.
tr.v. tranced, trancing, trances
To put into a trance; entrance.

trance′like′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trance

Psychiatry A state of focused attention and diminished sensory and motor activity seen in hypnosis, hysterical neurosis, dissociative types. See Ecstatic religious state, Neurosis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

trance

(trans)
An altered state of consciousness as in hypnosis, catalepsy, or ecstasy.
[L. transeo, to go across]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trance

A state of reduced consciousness with diminished voluntary action. Trances may occur in some forms of EPILEPSY, in CATALEPSY, in HYSTERIA and in HYPNOSIS.

TRANCE

Acronym for tumour-necrosis-factor-related activation-induced cytokine. This cytokine stimulates osteoclast differentiation and offers the possibility of developing new control over bone loss in osteoporosis.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005