trail-making test

trail-making test

Reitan's test A two-part test for assessing motor speed and integration, in which multiple dots are connected to form various objects; like the Bender-Gestalt test, the 'Trail-maker' screens for gross organic defects. See Psychological testing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Measurements were the Chinese-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, the Stroop Color-Word Test, the Trail-Making Test, and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Parents (BRIEF).
The tests were divided into six sessions: Session 1--The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test; Session 2--The Trail-making Test for Preschoolers and the Cancellation Attention Test; Session 3 Test of Recognition of Letters and Test of Recognition of Sounds; Session 4--The Phonological Awareness Test by Oral Production; Session 5--The Child Naming Test, The Pseudowords and Words Repetition Test, the Reading and Writing Test; and Session 6--The Semantic Stroop Test.
Indeed, the sole metric where the long-duration fibrofog patients fared significantly worse was the Trail-Making Test A, which provides a measure of spatial scanning and cognitive sequencing.
Most respondents (78%) reported routine and regular ("often") use of the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), 74% the Clock Drawing Test (CDT), 43% the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R), 29% the Verbal Fluency Task (FAS), 32% the Three-word Recall (3WR), and 12% the Trail-making Test (TMT).
We used the Trail-Making Test, Part B (TMT-B) as a more sensitive measure of cognitive functioning for all participants [40-42].
These included the Trail-Making Test, which measures motor speed, visual attention, and cognitive flexibility; the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, which measures the ability to problem solve; a delayed recall test; the American National Adult Reading Test; and the Geriatric Depression Scale.
Three tests were used to evaluate cognitive function: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), which assessed orientation, attention, calcula-tion, and recall (a score of 24 or less indicated poor cognitive function); the Trail-Making Test B, which gauged executive function (a score of 132 seconds or more indicated poor function); and a category fluency test that asked participants to name as many animals as they could in 1 minute (a score of 12 or less indicated poor function).
This test battery, which was again administered at 1, 2, and 4 years after baseline, included the WRAML (Sheslow and Adams 1990), the WRAVMA (Adams and Sheslow 1995), the Trail-Making Test (Spreen and Strauss 1991), finger tapping (the WPS Electronic Tapping Test; Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, CA), ordered and unordered verbal cancellation (Mesulam 1985), category fluency (McCarthy 1972), the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (letter fluency) (Spreen and Strauss 1991), simple visual reaction time (the Standard Reaction Timer; Software Science, Cincinnati, OH), the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test (Trenerry et al.
The Trail-Making Test was used to measure a subject's Central Processing Speed.
After the investigators controlled for education levels, higher MELD scores were significantly associated with lower scores on the immediate memory and delayed memory subtests of RBANS, as well as with lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Exam, the Shipley Institute of Living Scale, and the Trail-Making Test, parts A and B.
More recently Siegert and Cavana (1997) have reported norms for the Trail-Making Test, a popular test of attention, from the same sample of elders as Newlove.