hamartia

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Related to tragic flaw: hamartia

hamartia

 [ham-ahr´she-ah]
a defect of tissue combination during development.

ha·mar·ti·a

(ham-ahr'shē-ă),
A localized developmental disturbance characterized by abnormal arrangement and/or combinations of the tissues normally present in the area.
[G. hamartion, a bodily defect]

hamartia

A near-extinct term for a developmental (embryonic) defect.

ha·mar·ti·a

(ham-ahr'shē-ă)
A localized developmental disturbance characterized by abnormal arrangement and/or combinations of the tissues normally present in the area.
[G. hamartion, a bodily defect]
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References in periodicals archive ?
(24) Kaplan presents them, especially Petraeus, as heroes with tragic flaws. (25) In Kaplan's view (ultimately proven true in Afghanistan), COIN was a strategy that works in specific circumstances and areas where the local government and U.S.
Regarding the notion of tragic flaw, Hammersmith writes that "Macbeth's 'tragic flaw' is his ambition ...
"The tragic flaw in the Tory approach is that, without work, it won't work and a longer dole queue will mean a bigger benefits bill."
A tragic flaw by a junior officer like such act should be taken up seriously at the highest level," he added.
His tragic flaw, one might say, was that he clung to this cautious stance for too long even when times had changed.
His contextual interpretation of documents and material from many sources lead the author to the conclusion that Pius XII did, in fact, act in a consistent manner towards the persecuted Jews of Europe, and highlights the tragic flaw that relegated the Jews to be "lesser victims." His failure points to the moral crisis within many parts of the fractured Christian Commonwealth, as well as the personal culpability of Pacelli, the man and pope.
For older students Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, with its story of a great man and his tragic flaw, works brilliantly in conjunction with Shakespearean tragedy--and any student who's seen the Coen Brothers' O Brother Where Art Thou, has a head start for appreciating the Depression era novels, Of Mice and Men and Grapes of Wrath.
Even if this were humanly possible, it would, even then, never guarantee "sustainability." I fear that greed is the tragic flaw of the human species.
His heroism is limited to his exploits on the battlefield; his tragic flaw is his inability to "flatter" to get what he wants.
"Bundy was not a warmonger," Preston insists, "but neither was he a tragic hero, unable to escape the curse of his tragic flaw. He should have known better, and often he did." This is right on the money.
He already had a serious drink problem when he became leader in 1999, according to Charles Kennedy: A Tragic Flaw.
In the book, Charles Kennedy, A Tragic Flaw, he warned Mr Kennedy in 2004 that "the next time you pick up a drink, you give up being leader".