track


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track

noun Substance abuse A punctate, erythematous linear scar on the skin of the extremities, neck, and groin, and on mucocutaneous surfaces, which may be accompanied by intense venous sclerosis and edema of the extremities, a typical finding in heroin addicts. Cf Skin 'popping. '.

track

(trak)
1. The path or course of a penetrating injury.
2. A treatment regimen or protocol.
References in classic literature ?
Saxon asked, calling attention to an elderly woman beneath them on the track, who had sat down and was pulling from her foot an elastic-sided shoe of generous dimensions.
It is vain to look elsewhere for tracks in this dry weather, but at THAT point there is certainly a chance of some record being left.
Sheep-marks there were in profusion, and at one place, some miles down, cows had left their tracks.
We did so, and at the end of a few hundred yards lost the tracks as we emerged from the boggy portion of the moor.
It is, of course, possible that a cunning man might change the tires of his bicycle in order to leave unfamiliar tracks.
The tracks of the tire began to curve fantastically upon the wet and shining path.
Strange, Watson, that we should see tracks all along our line, but never a cow on the whole moor.
Can you recall that the tracks were sometimes like that, Watson"--he arranged a number of bread-crumbs in this fashion--
This fellow Hayes had shod his horses with shoes which counterfeited the tracks of cows.
Wasn't Hollywood Park where fans were supposed to worry about a weird track last week?
For example, to give riders a sense of traveling over a hilly terrain, the coaster track has many ups and downs.
Heat makes track shoes soft and weakens their resistance to sharp rocks and plant spines.