tracheobronchial tree


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tree

 [tre]
an anatomic structure with branches resembling a tree.
bronchial tree the bronchi and their branching structures; see color plates.
tracheobronchial tree the trachea, bronchi, and their branching structures; see color plates.

tracheobronchial tree

The trachea, bronchi, and their branches.
See also: tree
References in periodicals archive ?
Lesions of the tracheobronchial tree need an urgent and decisive decision because a delay in action may reduce the possibilities of survival.
3 In addition; the aspirated foreign bodies (FB) that reach to the distal segments of tracheobronchial tree can cause serious complications such as recurrent bronchopneumonia, atelectasis, and bronchiectasis.
In individual cases, various segments of the tracheobronchial tree are involved to various extents.
Firstly, it is to study the feasibility of transient airflow simulation within a whole respiratory period in a CT-scanned human tracheobronchial tree with more than 100 outlets.
The nature/type of FB and the site of arrest or impaction along the tracheobronchial tree decide the clinical course and outcome of inhaled FBs.
Relapsing polychondritis is a rare autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by episodic inflammation/destruction of cartilaginous structures including the ear, nose, peripheral joints and tracheobronchial tree. (4,12) Immune damage may also spread to non-cartilaginous tissues like kidney, blood vessels, eye, and heart.
The only complication observed was minor bleeding within the tracheobronchial tree. This bleeding was asymptomatic and discovered only during bronchoscopic examination.
First, the value for height (h) does not appreciably change because the flow through the tracheobronchial tree originates from the pressure gradient between the mouth and the alveoli.
The challenge in managing such cases lies in establishing and maintaining a patent airway and also preventing seepage of blood and tumour particles distally into the tracheobronchial tree during the surgery.
Structural change is swelling of the nasal passageways, Eustachian tube, osteomeatal sinus pathway, and tracheobronchial tree. Physiologic change is increased mucus production and reduced cilia beat, resulting in stasis of thickened mucus in the respiratory tree.
(9) Involvement of the tracheobronchial tree, although rare, is the most common manifestation of thoracic amyloidosis.
Laryngeal aspergillosis usually occurs as a result of secondary invasion from the tracheobronchial tree, more commonly in immunocompromised hosts.