trachea

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Related to tracheas: windpipe

trachea

 [tra´ke-ah] (pl. tra´cheae)
the air passage extending from the throat and larynx to the main bronchi; it is about 1.5 cm (0.6 in) wide and 10 cm (4 in) long and is reinforced at the front and sides by a series of C-shaped rings of cartilage that keep the passage uniformly open. The gaps between the rings are bridged by strong fibroelastic membranes. The trachea is lined with mucous membrane covered with small hairlike processes called cilia that continuously sweep foreign material out of the breathing passages toward the mouth, a process retarded by cold but speeded by heat. Called also windpipe. adj., adj tra´cheal.

Although the trachea is closed off by the lidlike epiglottis during swallowing, a foreign body such as a piece of meat occasionally becomes lodged in the trachea and causes choking. If a heimlich maneuver does not succeed in dislodging the foreign body, emergency tracheostomy (surgical incision of the trachea) may be necessary. Another reason for tracheostomy is in order to insert a tube for passage of air when the trachea is obstructed by swelling due to infection or allergic reaction, by accumulation of tracheobronchial secretions, or by a growth such as a polyp or tumor.

tra·che·a

, pl.

tra·che·ae

(trā'kē-ă, -kē-ē), [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax to the level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into the right and left bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 incomplete rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]

trachea

(trā′kē-ə)
n. pl. tra·cheae (-kē-ē′) or tra·cheas
1. Anatomy A thin-walled, cartilaginous tube descending from the larynx to the bronchi and carrying air to the lungs. Also called windpipe.
2. Zoology One of the internal respiratory tubes of insects and some other terrestrial arthropods, which are connected to the spiracles and are used for gas exchange.

tra′che·al adj.

trachea

The tubular structure which connects the larynx to the primary bronchi. In non-smokers, it is covered by pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium, that transfers particulates out of the bronchi and bronchioles, aided by secretions from mucus-producing goblet cells.

Pronunciation 
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, truh KEY uh 
Medspeak-US: pronounced, TRAY key uh

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax (level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra), where it bifurcates into the right and left main bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]

trachea

The windpipe. A cylindrical tube of mucous membrane and muscle reinforced by rings of CARTILAGE, that extends downwards into the chest from the bottom of the LARYNX for about 10 cm. The trachea terminates when it branches into two main bronchi.

trachea

  1. (in vertebrates; also called windpipe) the main tube leading from the glottis in the neck to the point where the bronchia branch to the lungs. It consists of a fibrous pipe supported by C-shaped cartilage rings to prevent collapse when the head is turned.
  2. (in insects) a series of TRACHEOLES by which air is conducted into the body from external openings called spiracles. See also TRACHEAL GILL.
  3. (in plants) see XYLEM VESSEL.

trachea

an empty tube formed from the longitudinal fusion of several cells with strong walls reinforced with LIGNIN, whose function is the mass transport of water for TRANSPIRATION. Vessels are aggregated into XYLEM tissue within the VASCULAR BUNDLES of ANGIOSPERMS.

Trachea

The tube that leads from the larynx or voice box to two major air passages that bring oxygen to each lung. The trachea is sometimes called the windpipe.

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
Air tube extending from larynx into thorax to level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into right and left bronchi.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
References in periodicals archive ?
The structures that make up the posterior respiratory system of boto and tucuxi were evaluated macroscopically at the UFAC's Laboratory of Animal Anatomy (Center for Biological and Nature Sciences) and the following biometric parameters were taken: length, width and thickness of the components of the trachea, tracheal bronchus, main bronchi and lungs.
After the macroscopic analysis, fragments of the trachea, tracheal bronchus, main and secondary bronchi, and lungs were removed from the parietal and mediastinal surfaces in their cranial, middle and caudal regions.
(2) Computed tomography (CT) images were obtained to accurately measure the strictured areas of the tracheal lumen as well as the maximum diameter of the healthy trachea cranial and caudal to these areas.
Based on the measurements obtained from the CT images, a 4-mm X 36-mm, custom-made nitinol wire stent was chosen to address the stricture in the trachea. This customized stent was manufactured to be 10% oversized, self-expanding, and equivalent to the maximum diameter of the healthy-appearing areas of trachea cranial and caudal to the strictured area.
(1) Effect on tracheal resting tension - this test examined the effect of the drug on the simulating condition of the resting trachea condition;
(3) Effect of Kidsolone on electrically induced contractions - electrical stimulation of this tissue causes parasympathetic nerve remnants in the trachea to release the transmitter acetylcholine.
The anatomical structures of the trachea have been reported in the horse, camel, dog, ruminants [12-14], and giraffe, but no such a report could be cited in the literature with respect to Red Sokoto (Maradi) goat (Capra hircus).
After two weeks of perfusion, fascia and muscles of the ventral aspect of the neck were gently dissected to expose the trachea. The whole trachea was then removed from the cricoid cartilage of the larynx to the lungs.
In this study, length of the trachea and number of the tracheal cartilages in Turkish people were investigated, with emphasis on the relationships to body height and sex.
It was progressing and almost completely blocked the trachea.
A reverse "L" shape skin incision was made, the trachea was transected below the tumor, and a tracheal tube was inserted into the distal trachea to maintain ventilation and anesthesia.
This surgery is the seventh successful implant of a regenerated trachea in a human using HART technology.