trachea


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trachea

 [tra´ke-ah] (pl. tra´cheae)
the air passage extending from the throat and larynx to the main bronchi; it is about 1.5 cm (0.6 in) wide and 10 cm (4 in) long and is reinforced at the front and sides by a series of C-shaped rings of cartilage that keep the passage uniformly open. The gaps between the rings are bridged by strong fibroelastic membranes. The trachea is lined with mucous membrane covered with small hairlike processes called cilia that continuously sweep foreign material out of the breathing passages toward the mouth, a process retarded by cold but speeded by heat. Called also windpipe. adj., adj tra´cheal.

Although the trachea is closed off by the lidlike epiglottis during swallowing, a foreign body such as a piece of meat occasionally becomes lodged in the trachea and causes choking. If a heimlich maneuver does not succeed in dislodging the foreign body, emergency tracheostomy (surgical incision of the trachea) may be necessary. Another reason for tracheostomy is in order to insert a tube for passage of air when the trachea is obstructed by swelling due to infection or allergic reaction, by accumulation of tracheobronchial secretions, or by a growth such as a polyp or tumor.

tra·che·a

, pl.

tra·che·ae

(trā'kē-ă, -kē-ē), [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax to the level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into the right and left bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 incomplete rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]

trachea

(trā′kē-ə)
n. pl. tra·cheae (-kē-ē′) or tra·cheas
1. Anatomy A thin-walled, cartilaginous tube descending from the larynx to the bronchi and carrying air to the lungs. Also called windpipe.
2. Zoology One of the internal respiratory tubes of insects and some other terrestrial arthropods, which are connected to the spiracles and are used for gas exchange.

tra′che·al adj.

trachea

The tubular structure which connects the larynx to the primary bronchi. In non-smokers, it is covered by pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium, that transfers particulates out of the bronchi and bronchioles, aided by secretions from mucus-producing goblet cells.

Pronunciation 
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, truh KEY uh 
Medspeak-US: pronounced, TRAY key uh

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax (level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra), where it bifurcates into the right and left main bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]

trachea

The windpipe. A cylindrical tube of mucous membrane and muscle reinforced by rings of CARTILAGE, that extends downwards into the chest from the bottom of the LARYNX for about 10 cm. The trachea terminates when it branches into two main bronchi.

trachea

  1. (in vertebrates; also called windpipe) the main tube leading from the glottis in the neck to the point where the bronchia branch to the lungs. It consists of a fibrous pipe supported by C-shaped cartilage rings to prevent collapse when the head is turned.
  2. (in insects) a series of TRACHEOLES by which air is conducted into the body from external openings called spiracles. See also TRACHEAL GILL.
  3. (in plants) see XYLEM VESSEL.

trachea

an empty tube formed from the longitudinal fusion of several cells with strong walls reinforced with LIGNIN, whose function is the mass transport of water for TRANSPIRATION. Vessels are aggregated into XYLEM tissue within the VASCULAR BUNDLES of ANGIOSPERMS.

Trachea

The tube that leads from the larynx or voice box to two major air passages that bring oxygen to each lung. The trachea is sometimes called the windpipe.

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
Air tube extending from larynx into thorax to level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into right and left bronchi.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the literature, there have been cases of injury or laceration of innominate vein, innominate artery, esophagus, trachea, brachial plexus, and even vena cava or compression on vena cava because of posterior dislocation and cases having symptoms due to compression of tumours of head of clavicle (2-9).
Ventilation was sustained by insertion of a reinforced tube to lower segment of trachea following removal of tracheostomy cannula.
CT scan is sometimes unable to show the connection between the mass and trachea, and three-dimensional reconstruction technology is helpful in establishing any communication between the cyst and trachea.
The doctor will find the Y-shaped red worms in the trachea and bronchi.
The first important role played by FOB is discovering and evaluation of possible injuries involving larynx and trachea which might be present before tracheostomy, as a consequence of translaryngeal intubation [26].
Preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan showed that the trachea was shifted to the right and compressed by a giant goitre, with a lumen of 4 mm x 14 mm at its narrowest point in the subglottic region.
Apart from these sites, recently solitary extramedullary plasmacytomas has been reported in trachea (Gupta et al., 2014), larynx (Witham et al., 2012), lung (Adelman et al., 2014), penile mucosa (Jackie et al., 2012) and digit (Gupta et al., 2014) of dogs.
It seemed that the virus was transported from the nasal cavity to the trachea by the respiratory tract lumen direct contact.
Ten years after the tracheal reconstruction, patients with malignant diseases died from other reasons independent of the functioning of the artificial trachea itself while patients with benign diseases still live normal life without major complications.
Caption: Figure 3: HRCT showing dilated trachea and the main bronchi.
Caption: Figure 1: Chest X-ray conducted 24 years ago, displaying a trachea enlargement without any signs of fibrosis.
The company has begun development of an anatomical scaffold prototype based on the trachea. The patent pending technology can provide the researcher with off-the-shelf scaffolds for a range of structures in various sizes to meet demographic demands.