traceback

traceback

Epidemiology Any maneuver designed to follow a public health issue–eg, outbreak of infection or exposure to a toxic substance–to its source. See Lookback, Outbreak.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

traceback

Identification of the source of an outbreak of disease or of a public health emergency.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Public health departments and government agencies can work more closely with the food industries, which understand how their foods are produced and distributed, to speed up multistate state foodborne disease outbreak and traceback investigations.
Rapid identification and reporting of CFP cases to public health officials is imperative to facilitate supportive medical care (1,2) and source-food traceback efforts.
The transient nature of turtle vendors hampered the traceback investigation.
Traceback using receipts and shopper card data indicated the patient's family purchased recalled fruit.
To identify the contaminated food and find the source of the contamination, CDC, state and local health and agriculture departments and laboratories, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory investigations.
The food safety curriculum covers aspects of food science that affect millions of people every day, such as how a traceback investigation is used to stop the additional sale and distribution of contaminated food and the likelihood of certain foods to cause foodborne illness more than others.
AT&T actively seeks to root out suspected illegal robocalls at their source as a founding member of USTelecom's Industry Traceback Group, through which we regularly identify and investigate suspected high-volume robocall operations to refer to federal and state law enforcement."
"Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicates Cavi brand whole, fresh papayas are a likely source of this outbreak.