trace elements


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trace el·e·ments

elements present in minute amounts in the body, many of which are essential in metabolism or for the manufacture of essential compounds, for example, Zn, Se, V, Ni, Mg, Mn.

trace el·e·ments

(trās el'ĕ-mĕnts)
Elements present in minute amounts in the body (e.g., Zn, Se, V, Ni, Mg, Mn), many of which are essential in metabolism or for the manufacture of essential compounds.

trace elements

Dietary minerals required only in tiny amounts to maintain health. They include zinc, copper, chromium and selenium, and are rarely deficient except under unusual circumstances such as artificial feeding.

Trace elements

A group of elements that are present in the human body in very small amounts but are nonetheless important to good health. They include chromium, copper, cobalt, iodine, iron, selenium, and zinc. Trace elements are also called micronutrients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination of trace elements in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with tetramethylammonium hydroxide solubilization at room temperature.
In this work, the contents of trace elements and REEs in oil shale samples from several mineral areas of China were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).
The concentration of trace elements in the oldest continental rock allows geoscientists to reconstruct possible bedrock based on their minerals and thus determine at what depth the continental crust originated.
Once runoff has passed through the rock barrier, it flows through sand and is cleaned of most impurities such as silts, trace elements, and excess nutrients.
To show the importance of the above trace elements as biochemical markers (tumor markers) in lymphoma cancer disease.
Long-term occupational exposure to trace elements can be read from metal distribution patterns in scalp hair.
However, to our knowledge no study has been conducted to investigate the influence of biochar on the bioavailability of trace elements applied to soil at varying rates.
The increasing presence of trace elements in soils, crops, and the environment is a blessing and curse, suggests Prasad (environmental biology, U.
Thus, it is best considered as a reflection of the "real" level in the body of the trace elements, or internal dose, as opposed to the potential exposure that is measured by occupational hygienists.
Many technique have been used to determine trace elements concentration in hair (10,11).
Ms Jones wants officials to look into the use of micro-nutrients or trace elements in tackling the disease in badgers as well as cattle.