trace


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Related to trace: Traceroute, Trace route

trace

(trās),
1. Evidence of the former existence, influence, or action of an object, phenomenon, or event.
2. An extremely small amount or barely discernible indication of something.

TRACE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Trandolapril Cardiac Evaluation that evaluated the effect of an ACE inhibitor on the M&M of Pts with acute MI. See Acute myocardial infarction, Trandolapril Molecular medicine Trial of Genetic Assessment in Breast Cancer.

trace

(tras) [O.Fr. tracier]
1. A very small quantity.
2. A visible mark or sign.

primitive trace

Synonym: primitive streak

trace

(trās)
1. Evidence of former existence, influence, or action of an object, phenomenon, or event.
2. Extremely small amount or barely discernible indication of something.
References in classic literature ?
But these traces, and such hieroglyphics, or, to be more exact pictographs, as I have been able to decipher from the old documents, tell of one country, or perhaps it was only a city, over which this great golden idol of Quitzel presided.
The aspect of the venerable mansion has always affected me like a human countenance, bearing the traces not merely of outward storm and sunshine, but expressive also, of the long lapse of mortal life, and accompanying vicissitudes that have passed within.
But the object that most drew my attention to the mysterious package was a certain affair of fine red cloth, much worn and faded, There were traces about it of gold embroidery, which, however, was greatly frayed and defaced, so that none, or very little, of the glitter was left.
We must discover her by personal description -- we can trace her in no other way.
I have always thought, that one of the most curious and valuable objects of antiquaries has been to trace the progress of society, by the efforts made in early ages to improve the rudeness of their first expedients, until they either approach excellence, or, as is more frequently the case, are supplied by new and fundamental discoveries, which supersede both the earlier and ruder system, and the improvements which have been ingrafted upon it.
The rocks about me were of a harsh reddish colour, and all the trace of life that I could see at first was the intensely green vegetation that covered every projecting point on their south-eastern face.
On the 3d of September he arrived on the summit of a mountain which commanded a full view of the eventful valley of Pierre's Hole; whence he could trace the winding of its stream through green meadows, and forests of willow and cotton-wood, and have a prospect, between distant mountains, of the lava plains of Snake River, dimly spread forth like a sleeping ocean below.
He was black in the face, and they scarcely could trace The least likeness to what he had been: While so great was his fright that his waistcoat turned white- A wonderful thing to be seen!
Kotuko made him a tiny harness with a trace to it, and hauled him all over the house- floor, shouting: "Aua
This is the very person,' she said, 'whom your lawyer thought likely to help him, when he was trying to trace the lost courier.
After the insulting words which his master had spoken to him, Dermody's pride was concerned in leaving no trace of his whereabouts; my father might consider it as a trace purposely left with the object of reuniting Mary and me.
It was seamed and furrowed; he could trace the lines with the tips of his fingers.