trabeculation

trabeculation

 [trah-bek″u-la´shun]
the formation of trabeculae in a part.

tra·bec·u·la·tion

(tră-bek'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. The occurrence of trabeculae in the walls of an organ or part.
2. The process of forming trabeculae, as in spongy bone.

trabeculation

The formation of ridges on a surface.

trabeculation

the formation of trabeculae in a part.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Osteitis fibrosa is a constellation of osteolytic lesions, cortical thinning, and coarsened trabeculation.
Increased intravesical pressure may cause hydroureteronephrosis or severe trabeculation of the bladder wall (3).
Ventrodorsal (Fig 1B) and right lateral orthogonal radiographs revealed that the right humerus was diffusely mottled in opacity with loss of healthy bone trabeculation.
Despite its functional nature, children with HS commonly present signs suggestive of anatomical outlet obstruction, such as upper tract dilatation, bladder wall thickening and trabeculation, and impaired renal function, which may resemble posterior urethral valves or urethral stricture.
28,31) Records comparison in a mass fatality incident uses victim identification software to order possible matches, and includes matching unique identifying factors such as individual tooth crown and root anatomy (wear, fractures, anomalies of size, shape and color), pulp morphology, size of restorations, base materials and trabeculation patterns.
Generalized sclerosis of the skeleton was present without trabeculation and little or no differentiation between cortical and medullary regions.
Flat bones, on the other hand, have less trabeculation and collagen content and as such are more sensitive to deformation and pain, as they are structured to contain red bone marrow.
Radiological union was defined as the presence of cross trabeculation on both AP and lateral radiographs.
Men with bladder trabeculation due to BPH were more challenging in diagnosing small lesion of the epithelium compared to women that rarely presented with detrusor hypertrophy.
Signal transduction in early heart development (II): ventricular chamber specification, trabeculation, and heart valve formation.
Endosteal scalloping of an affected bone may be present with suggestive, coarse trabeculation within the lesion (Figure 5, A).
This result was largely unremarkable with normal kidneys and ureters and only slight trabeculation of the bladder mucosa.