trabecula

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trabecula

 [trah-bek´u-lah] (L.)
a small beam or supporting structure; used in anatomic nomenclature to designate various fibromuscular bands or cords providing support in various organs, as heart, penis, and spleen, adj., adj trabec´ular.
trabeculae of bone anastomosing bony spicules in cancellous bone which form a meshwork of intercommunicating spaces that are filled with bone marrow.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tra·bec·u·la

, gen. and pl.

tra·bec·u·lae

(tră-bek'yū-lă, -lē), [TA]
1. A meshwork; one of the supporting bundles of fibers traversing the substance of a structure, usually derived from the capsule or one of the fibrous septa.
2. A small piece of the spongy substance of bone usually interconnected with other similar pieces.
3. In histopathology, a band of neoplastic tissue two or more cells wide.
[L. dim. of trabs, a beam]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trabecula

(trə-bĕk′yə-lə)
n. pl. trabecu·lae (-lē′)
1. Any of the supporting strands of connective tissue projecting into an organ and constituting part of the framework of that organ.
2. Any of the fine spicules forming a network in cancellous bone.

tra·bec′u·lar adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tra·bec·u·la

, pl. trabeculae (tră-bek'yū-lă, -lē) [TA]
1. One of the supporting bundles of fibers traversing the substance of a structure, usually derived from the capsule or one of the fibrous septa.
2. A small piece of the spongy substance of bone usually interconnected with other similar pieces.
3. histopathology A band of neoplastic tissue two or more cells wide.
[L. dim. of trabs, a beam]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trabecula

Supporting strands of connective tissue constituting part of the framework of an organ.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tra·bec·u·la

, pl. trabeculae (tră-bek'yū-lă, -lē) [TA]
Meshwork; one of the supporting bundles of fibers traversing substance of a structure, usually derived from the capsule or one of the fibrous septa.
[L. dim. of trabs, a beam]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Kilner, "Regional thicknesses and thickening of compacted and trabeculated myocardial layers of the normal left ventricle studied by cardiovascular magnetic resonance," Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, vol.
Angiographic study showed enlarged and globally hypokinetic LV with trabeculated apex and elevated right-sided pressure.
[6] The cortical wall composed of loosely trabeculated osseous tissue and many thin walled vessel.
The trabeculated appearance with polygonal cells and abundant cytoplasm also brought hepatocellular carcinoma and adrenal cortical carcinoma into the differential considerations.
On cystoscopy, 113(45%) of these patients were diagnosed as enlarged prostate, 56(22%) as cystitis, 28(12%) as trabeculated bladder, and 14(5%) as vesical calculus, uretheral stenosis and uretheral stricture.
The bladder was moderately trabeculated and had multiple yellow-colored punctate lesions throughout.
The mass felt rubbery and sectioning revealed a gelatinous, tan-pink to grey surface that was focally trabeculated.
In the absence of a definable structural or neurological cause, the bladder becomes large and trabeculated in response to repeated contractions against closed sphincter.
The lesion had a finely trabeculated cut surface with minute cystic spaces separated by bony septae.
Bowhead cortex is often so thick that the proximal ends of ribs, for example, are practically devoid of trabeculated bone.
This endothelial lining was continuous with the endothelial cells lining the trabeculated part of the ventricular wall.
Angioleiomyoma usually has a firm, white to tan, and trabeculated cut surface; in contrast, an endometrial stromal nodule has a more fleshy and yellow to tan cut surface.