Toxoplasma

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Toxoplasma

 [tok″so-plaz´mah]
a genus of sporozoans that are parasites of humans, other mammals, and some birds; it includes one species, T. gon´dii, that can be transmitted from an infected mother to an infant in utero or at birth. See also toxoplasmosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

toxoplasma

(tŏk′sə-plăz′mə)
n.
Any of various parasitic protozoans of the genus Toxoplasma, including some that cause disease in birds and mammals.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rate of toxoplasma antibodies 22.56% was higher than that in rural areas where the rate was14.82%, P<0.05.
Table 4 shows the relationship between toxoplasma antibodies and abortion via which the toxoplasma rate in sera of women without abortion (21.64%) was higher in sera of women who had abortions (11.67%), P<0.05.
The 16.75% rate of toxoplasma antibodies in the present study is high and reflects the degree of contamination of food and water with the infective stage of oocysts by cat feces.
High incidence of toxoplasma antibodies during autumn can be attributed to the climate.
Chiu, "Growth and development of Toxoplasma gondii in human neurons and astrocytes," Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, vol.
Jeffers, "Mechanisms of Toxoplasma gondii persistence and latency," FEMS Microbiology Reviews, vol.
Pettersen, "Tissue cyst rupture in mice chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii.
Denkers et al., "In the absence of endogenous IFN-gamma, mice develop unimpaired IL-12 responses to Toxoplasma gondii while failing to control acute infection," Journal of Immunology, vol.
Toxoplasma gondii infection and cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients.
Identification of a 200-to 300-fold repetitive 529 bp DNA fragment in Toxoplasma gondii, and its use for diagnostic and quantitative PCR.
Direct and sensitive detection of a pathogenic protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, by polymerase chain reaction.
Rapid prenatal diagnosis of congenital Toxoplasma infection by using polymerase chain reaction and amniotic fluid.