toxicologist


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toxicologist

 [tok″sĭ-kol´ah-jist]
a specialist in toxicology.
developmental toxicologist one who specializes in developmental toxicology; see also teratologist.
reproductive toxicologist one who studies the effects of toxins on the reproductive system.

tox·i·col·o·gist

(tok'si-kol'ŏ-jist),
A specialist or expert in toxicology.

toxicologist

[tok′sikol′əjist]
a specialist in poisons, their effects, and antidotes.

tox·i·col·o·gist

(tok'si-kol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist or expert in toxicology.

tox·i·col·o·gist

(tok'si-kol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist or expert in toxicology.

toxicologist (tok´sikol´əjist),

n a person versed in toxicology.

toxicologist

a specialist in toxicology.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the autumn of 2005, at the age of 89, he was an invited keynote speaker at the meeting of the International Association of Forensic Toxicologists in Seoul, Korea.
Andrade and his colleagues at Charite University Medical School in Berlin note that the enzyme's suppressive action would have been missed if they had done what most toxicologists do--project low-dose impacts from high-dose tests.
Asheesh Tiwary, resident toxicologist for the school of veterinary medicine at University of California, Davis, worked on the blood tests Richard sent him.
The doctor decided to call in a toxicologist to perform thin-layer chromatography, which in fact demonstrated the presence of a tricyclic antidepressant, amitriptyline.
Sherri Kacinko, a Forensic Toxicologist at NMS Labs will also be recognized for her contributions to the field.
In short, this book is an excellent resource for teachers, clinical and forensic toxicologists, and physicians practicing emergency medicine.
He also has served on the Board of Directors of the Society of Forensic Toxicologists, the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and the American Board of Forensic Toxicologists.
He joins NMS Labs industry-leading team of experts including seven toxicologists certified by the American Board of Forensic Toxicology (ABFT).
The unusual qualities of engineered nanoparticles imply that they may have "unusual toxicity;' says molecular toxicologist Valerian Kagan of the University of Pittsburgh.
Bruce Macler, a drinking water toxicologist for the EPA, cited a study showing that chromium 6 levels would have to be as high as 20,000 ppb in drinking water to cause adverse effects in humans.
Lydy, an environmental toxicologist at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.
The metal is only harmful if it is ingested, said DTSC toxicologist Charles Miller.

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