toxicology

(redirected from toxicological)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to toxicological: toxicologist

toxicology

 [tok″sĭ-kol´ah-je]
the science or study of poisons. adj., adj toxicolog´ic.
developmental toxicology the study of the effects of toxins on developing embryos; see also teratology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tox·i·col·o·gy

(tok'si-kol'ŏ-jē),
The science of poisons, including their source, chemical composition, action, tests, and antidotes.
[toxico- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

toxicology

(tŏk′sĭ-kŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the nature, effects, and detection of poisons and the treatment of poisoning.

tox′i·co·log′i·cal (-kə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), tox′i·co·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
tox′i·co·log′i·cal·ly adv.
tox′i·col′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tox·i·col·o·gy

(tok'si-kol'ŏ-jē)
The science of poisons, including their source, chemical composition, action, tests, and antidotes.
[toxico- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

toxicology

The study of the nature, properties and identification of poisons, of their biological effects on living organisms and of the treatment of these effects.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Toxicology

The branch of medicine that deals with the effects, detection, and treatment of poisons.
Mentioned in: Poisoning
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tox·i·col·o·gy

(tok'si-kol'ŏ-jē)
Science of poisons, including their source, chemical composition, action, tests, and antidotes.
[toxico- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
NTP workshops, conferences, and reports in recent years have covered a broad range of emerging and continuing toxicological issues.
It is one of the most important toxicological endpoint in the development and evaluation of ingredients used in fragrance, cosmetic and personal care products.
"This will be an excellent educational tool for our students to help them understand the relationship between chemical's physical properties and toxicological properties, and how factors like biodegradability and bioaccumulation affect the population." - Associate Professor from college in Minneapolis, MN
Next is a relevance to public health chapter that discusses the significance of the toxicological findings in regards to how they may impact public health.
Citation: "Human embryonic stem cell derived hepatocyte-like cells as a tool for in vitro hazard assessment of chemical carcinogenicity;" Journal of Toxicological Sciences, first published online, 27 August 2011, DOI: 10.1093/toxsci/kfr225
A letter of access may provide a single company access to data from one or more toxicological or exposure studies conducted by another company, or it may provide access to data for an entire Substance Information Exchange Forum, or SIEF, according to a statement made to the Bureau of National Affairs.
Provided the repellents continue to work well when tested in the laboratory on human skin, and if they pass the battery of toxicological tests, they would still face a series of tests to prove their effectiveness in making mosquitoes bug off, Bernier said.
The EU-UNDP Central Asia Drug Action Programme (CADAP) handed over two sets of specialized equipment and two refrigerators to the toxicological laboratory under the Forensic Medical Bureau of the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health.The equipment (rapid thin layer chromatography system including reagents and calibration standards) will be used for drug detection and drug identification in humans.
The place of toxicology in history opens the book, and is followed by sections on basic toxicological principles, agents that cause toxicity, and toxicological testing methods, including many of the test protocols required to meet regulatory needs worldwide.
ICCVAM is a permanent interagency committee composed of representatives from 15 federal regulatory and research agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), that use, generate or disseminate toxicological information.
This is a toxicological monograph which describes the food additive in question, summarizes the toxicological data, and provides evaluation based on likely total human intake for each of these specific food additives, and recommends the ADIs.