toxicant


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toxicant

 [tok´sĭ-kant]
1. poisonous.
2. poison.
developmental toxicant teratogen.

tox·i·cant

(tok'si-kănt),
1. Synonym(s): poisonous
2. Any poisonous agent, specifically an alcohol or other poison, causing symptoms of what is popularly called intoxication.

toxicant

/tox·i·cant/ (tok´sĭ-kant)
1. poisonous.
2. poison.

toxicant

(tŏk′sĭ-kənt)
n.
A poison or poisonous agent.
adj.
Poisonous; toxic.

toxicant

[tok′sikənt]
any poisonous agent.

in·tox·i·cant

(in-tok'si-kănt)
1. Having the power to intoxicate.
2. An intoxicating agent, such as alcohol.
Synonym(s): toxicant.

tox·in

(tok'sin)
1. A noxious or poisonous substance that is formed or elaborated as an integral part of the cell or tissue, as an extracellular product (exotoxin), or as a combination of the two during the metabolism and growth of certain microorganisms and some higher plant and animal species.
2. A common misnomer for poison.
[G. toxikon, poison]

toxicant

1. poisonous.
2. a poison.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because glo vapour has lower levels of toxicants than cigarette smoke, it should in principle expose consumers to much less toxicants.
Since both the environmental pollution and the eating habits may affect the metal concentrations [16,20-23], such levels could be measured as an index of toxicants exposure.
Toxicants may also affect only specific organs while not producing damage to the body as a whole.
Diuron: 2,495 gallons; a suspected carcinogen, birth defects, blood toxicant
The ability of toxicants, particularly creosote, to simultaneously affect a variety of apparently unrelated parameters, such as phagocytosis, proliferation, and cellular cytotoxicity, does not simply reflect general morbidity or metabolic downturn resulting from toxicant poisoning.
Laboratory tests show that the technologies successfully reduce levels of some, though not all, toxicants in smoke.
Chemically diverse toxicants converge on Fyn and c-Cbl to disrupt precursor cell function.
The book is organized around toxicants at home and work (lead, radon, mold, asbestos), toxicants we eat, drink, or buy at the store (toxicants in food, water pollution, consumer products), toxicants in air (indoor and outdoor), and toxicants in the yard and neighborhood (garden, power lines, hazardous waste sites, volatile organics), and the authors also provide an informative section on cancer clusters.
Last year, an American Academy of Pediatrics report designated mercury a major environmental toxicant that "should not be present in the home or other environments of children: It explicitly identified old fever thermometers as a source.
DEHP, listed by the State of California as a reproductive toxicant, can harm the normal development of the male reproductive system in premature neonates, toddlers and adolescent boys(a,b).
Rosenblum and his team will establish a database focused on changes in protein activity that result from toxicant exposure.