toxic metal


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toxic metal

A generic term for any metal known to be toxic to humans—e.g., antimony, arsenic, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel.

toxic metal

Environment Any metal known to be toxic to humans–eg, antimony, arsenic, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel. Cf Nontoxic metal.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is used for monitoring toxic metal levels, for compliance verification, for on-site QC, and for documented traceability.
When it died, scientists discovered it had been poisoned by cadmium, a toxic metal that was found at eight times the normal concentration in the tortoise's liver and kidneys.
That's one implication of the discovery that blowflies, which can absorb mercury from fish carcasses that they feed on as larvae, rid themselves of much of the toxic metal when they develop into adults.
Toxic metal compounds are widely distributed in the environment and are frequently used in industrial processes (Hayes 1997).
In some regions, such as parts of Bangladesh and Taiwan, the drinking water levels of this toxic metal have been associated with diseases such as anemia, vascular lesions, peripheral neuropathy, and cancers of the skin, bladder, kidney, prostate, liver, and lung.
For aquatic organisms such as invertebrates and algae, it is copper, rather than arsenic that is the most toxic metal.
The Ravenna project will serve as a blueprint of Solucorp's ability to effectively remediate toxic metal contaminated sites for reuse.
That finding may require researchers to revise upward their estimates of how much of this toxic metal people consume in food, but the revised amount still doesn't exceed what's accepted as safe.
The authors conclude that these metal response patterns may shed new light on the mechanisms of human diseases caused by toxic metal exposures, and may also be useful for developing molecular biomarkers of exposure and effect in future mechanistic, epidemiologic, and risk assessment studies.
Products that leach at least 5 milligrams of any toxic metal per liter of solution must be designated as hazardous waste when discarded.
The addition of this toxic metal to the Report on Carcinogens, issued earlier this week by the Department of Health and Human Services, "simply confirms our worst fears; for example, the U.
More sophisticated tests for the toxic metal can be more reliable, but they require expensive equipment and expertise.