toxemia


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Related to toxemia: preeclampsia

toxemia

 [tok-se´me-ah]
1. the condition resulting from the spread of bacterial products (toxins) by the bloodstream.
2. a name formerly used to indicate a pregnancy-related syndrome typified by edema, proteinuria, and hypertension that was thought to be due to a toxin released by the mother in response to a foreign protein of the developing fetus. adj., adj toxe´mic.
toxemia of pregnancy former name for preeclampsia-eclampsia syndrome.

tox·e·mi·a

(tok-sē'mē-ă),
1. Clinical manifestations observed during certain infectious diseases, assumed to be caused by toxins and other noxious substances elaborated by the infectious agent; in certain infections by gram-negative bacteria, endotoxins probably play a role when the bacterial cell wall breaks down, releasing a complex lipopolysaccharide; however, the role of other bacterial substances is unclear, except in the case of the specific exotoxins such as those of diphtheria and tetanus.
2. The clinical syndrome caused by toxic substances in the blood.
3. A lay term referring to the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
Synonym(s): toxicemia
[G. toxikon, poison, + haima, blood]

toxemia

(tŏk-sē′mē-ə)
n.
A condition in which the blood contains toxins produced by body cells at a local source of infection or derived from the growth of microorganisms. Also called blood poisoning.

tox·e′mic adj.

toxemia

Gynecology A condition in which HTN and fluid retention occur late in pregnancy. See Preeclampsia.

tox·e·mi·a

(tok-sē'mē-ă )
1. Clinical manifestations observed during certain infectious diseases, assumed to be caused by toxins and other noxious substances elaborated by the infectious agent.
2. The clinical syndrome caused by toxic substances in the blood.
3. A lay term referring to the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
Synonym(s): toxaemia.
[G. toxikon, poison, + haima, blood]

Toxemia

Poisoning of the blood.
Mentioned in: Colonic Irrigation

tox·e·mi·a

(tok-sē'mē-ă )
1. Clinical manifestations observed during some infectious diseases, assumed to be caused by toxins and other noxious substances elaborated by infectious agent.
2. Clinical syndrome caused by toxic substances in blood.
[G. toxikon, poison, + haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pancreatic insulin release and peripheral insulin sensitivity in German black headed mutton and Finish Landrace ewes: evaluation of the role of insulin resistance in the susceptibility to ovine pregnancy toxemia. Domest Anim Endocrinol 2013; 44:213-21.
The role of the nervous and vascular system in the pathogenesis of toxemia of pregnancy and the principles of its treatment.
Consent to publish information pertaining to the diagnosis of intestinal toxemia botulism was obtained from the 3 case-patients.
Las adolescentes tambien manifiestan mayor propension a los partos prematuros, partos mas prolongados, toxemia y anemia.
Pregnancy toxemia is the result of a drop in the doe's blood glucose toward the end of the gestation as a result of the rapidly increasing energy demand of the fetus(es).
Benjamin is that for a product called Seasilver, which is promoted on its Web sire as having "remarkable results" for treating more than 100 conditions ranging from "cancer, all types" to Hodgkin's disease, broken bones, and toxemia.
Benjamin is that for a product called Seasilver, which is promoted on its Web site as having "remarkable results" for treating more than 100 conditions ranging from "cancer, all types" to Hodgkin's disease, broken bones, and toxemia.
Women pregnant with multiples are more likely than those with singletons to suffer premature delivery, toxemia (a potentially fatal form of high blood pressure), and hemorrhage.
Washington Hill, a neonatal specialist, informed Coreen and her husband Mark that she has developed toxemia, a dangerous form n of pregnancy-induced hypertension.
Its periodontal tissue is filled with such putrid microscopic pathogenic organisms that one nick of a tooth usually leads to death by toxemia. The documentary I watched on the Discovery Channel began by showing an ox being bitten by a Komodo dragon with the narrator explaining the victim's doom.
Installed near the front end of the chicken-processing line, cameras look for defects such as improperly bled birds and those afflicted by systemic diseases, such as septicemia and toxemia. Unique software and algorithms provide the intelligence for translating visual data from the system's cameras into the appropriate mechanical commands for dispensation of each chicken.