tourniquet


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tourniquet

 [toor´nĭ-ket]
a device for compression of an artery or vein; uses include stopping of the excessive bleeding of a hemorrhage, maintenance of a nearly bloodless operative field, prevention of spread of snake venom after a snakebite, and aiding in obtaining blood samples or giving intravenous injections.



For hemorrhage, a tourniquet should be used only as a last resort, when the bleeding is so severe that it is threatening the life of the injured person and cannot be stopped by direct pressure. In the case of snakebite, a moderately tight tourniquet may be applied to impede the spread of venom while not stopping arterial blood flow. For an intravenous injection, a loosely applied tourniquet inhibits blood flow in the superficial veins, making them more prominent so that a vein can be found for the injection. For maintenance of a nearly bloodless operative field, pneumatic tourniquets are often used. The American Association of Operating Room Nurses (AORN) has published guidelines for the use of tourniquets during surgery; see their web site at http://www.aorn.org.
To apply a tourniquet for control of arterial bleeding from the arm: Wrap a gauze pad twice with a strip of cloth just below the armpit and tie with a half knot; tie a stick at the knot with a square knot. Slowly twist stick to tighten.
tourniquet test one involving the application of a tourniquet to a limb, as in determination of capillary fragility (denoted by the appearance of petechiae) or of the status of the collateral circulation.

tour·ni·quet

(tūr'ni-ket),
An instrument for temporarily arresting the flow of blood to or from a distal part by pressure applied with an encircling device.
[Fr. fr. tourner, to turn]

tourniquet

(to͝or′nĭ-kĭt, tûr′-)
n.
A device, typically a tightly encircling bandage, used to check bleeding by temporarily stopping the flow of blood through a large artery in a limb.

tourniquet

A cord or constrictive band used to ↓ blood flow to 1+ extremity; tourniquets have clinical currency in ↓ the centripetal flow of toxins in snake and scorpion bites, and in ↓ the cardiac load in acute CHF, as may occur in an acute MI, where the tourniquets are rotated, simultaneously with other emergency measures–eg, O2, lasix, nitroprusside, nitroglycerin; when used, a tourniquet should be confined to the proximal part of the extremity. See Rotating tourniquet.

tour·ni·quet

(tŭr'ni-kĕt)
An instrument for temporarily arresting the flow of blood to or from a distal part by pressure applied with an encircling device.
[Fr. fr. tourner, to turn]

tourniquet

An encircling band placed around a limb and tightened enough to compress blood vessels and prevent blood flow. Tourniquets are used in surgery or in the emergency control of severe bleeding from an artery or a large vein, but are dangerous if left in place for more than an hour or so. A forgotten tourniquet inevitably causes GANGRENE and loss of the limb beyond the point of application.

Tourniquet

A device used to control bleeding, consisting of a constricting band applied tightly around a limb above the wound. It should only be used if the bleeding in life-threatening and can not be controlled by other means.
Mentioned in: Phlebotomy, Wounds

tour·ni·quet

(tŭr'ni-kĕt)
An instrument for temporarily arresting the flow of blood to or from a distal part by pressure applied with an encircling device.
[Fr. fr. tourner, to turn]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hair-thread tourniquet syndrome of an affected limb part is a life-threatening condition.
To minimize the amount of bleeding in cases of PPH, especially in cases of PP and PA, a few tourniquet techniques were decided in advance.
What the military teaches Soldiers in tourniquet application is substantial in breadth and occasionally in depth.
Therefore, in this study it was aimed to evaluate the effects of changes in XO and MDA values on haemodynamics and ischaemia/reperfusion damage of the use of saline and 6% HES 130/0.4 solution administered perioperatively in knee arthroscopy operations under spinal anaesthesia with a tourniquet.
Hair-thread tourniquet syndrome is a medical condition where in a hair or thread-like material becomes tied around limbs tightly and leads to ischemia (1).
Once the fetus was delivered, uterine blood supply was reduced by tourniquet binding around lower uterine segment like a belt.
Ninety-seven cases (57%) were performed with the use of a tourniquet with an average tourniquet time ([+ or -] SD) of 44.1 [+ or -] 32.9 minutes.
A case of rhabdomyolysis associated with use of a pneumatic tourniquet during arthroscopic knee surgery.
In the second step, with the sensor in the same position, a tourniquet with automatic inflation was placed above the knee.
The tourniquet was inflated immediately prior to skin incision and released on completion of skin closure and pressure dressing.
If the entire limb is not exposed, apply the tourniquet over clothing as proximally as possible.