totipotency


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to·ti·po·ten·cy

, totipotence (tō'tē-pō'ten-sē, tō-tip'ō-tens),
The ability of a cell to differentiate into any type of cell and thus form a new organism or regenerate any part of an organism; for example, a fertilized ovum, or a small excised portion of a Planaria, which is capable of regenerating a complete new organism.
[L. totus, entire, + potentia, power]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

to·ti·po·ten·cy

, totipotence (tō-tip'ŏ-tĕn-sē, -tĕns)
The ability of a cell to differentiate into any type of cell and thus form a new organism or regenerate any part of an organism.
[L. totus, entire, + potentia, power]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

totipotency

the ability of a cell or tissue to give rise to adult structures. The capacity is often lost in adult cells (particularly in animals) which, having differentiated into one specific type, cannot change to another type of cell. see GURDON, CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is relevant in biological terms, since it reflects that totipotency of male gametophytes would not be restricted to the stage of vacuolate microspore-early bicellular pollen, as is widely accepted.
Thus the stage of totipotency is leapfrogged in order to go directly to the pluripotent stage.
The first human egg was fertilized in vitro in 1968 and raised the possibility of exploitation of totipotency of stem cells.
The President's Council report draws a critical distinction between pluripotency, the capacity of a cell to give rise to many if not all the different cell types of the human body, and totipotency, the capacity of a zygote or other cell to develop as a complete, integrated, living being.
He posits a hierarchy with absolute strength--called totipotency and represented by the fertilized egg--at one end and absolute weakness--the totally differentiated cells of the developed organism--at the other.
The capability of a single mature plant cell to produce an entire organism is called totipotency. Because plant cells are all interconnected by cell walls, isolating a single cell is difficult.
Crucial to this approach is discovering a way to reverse cell differentiation all the way to pluripotency, but not (as in cloning) even further back to totipotency."
This may perhaps explain why the cells of every tissue, in spite of totipotency, can not be readily cultured (e.g., cell culture, cloning); a reprogramming to restore the cell to the original status may be required depending on the differentiation status of the tissue concerned.
Totipotency is the ability of a cell to regenerate a whole new organism, an identical twin.
A comparative analysis between totipotency and growth environment conditions of the donor plants in tissue culture of Zea mays L.
The latter is indeed "totipotent," but its totipotency arises from a non-totipotent cell.
The workers of large colonies do show a loss of totipotency, especially with respect to reproductive potential (Crespi and Yanega, 1995; Bourke, 1999), and they do show a loss of structures associated with reproduction (e.g., ovaries in ants); but they do not show signs of reduced behavioral or cognitive complexity.