enthalpy

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en·thal·py (H),

(en'thal-pē),
Heat content, symbolized as H; a thermodynamic function, defined as E + PV, where E is the internal energy of a system, P the pressure, and V the volume; the heat of a reaction, measured at constant pressure, is ΔH.
Synonym(s): heat (4)
[G. enthalpō, to warm in]

enthalpy

/en·thal·py/ (en´thal-pe) the heat content or chemical energy of a physical system; a thermodynamic function equal to the internal energy plus the product of the pressure and volume. Symbol H.

en·thal·py

(H) (en'thal-pē)
Heat content, symbolized as H; a thermodynamic function, defined as E + PV, where E is the internal energy of a system, P the pressure, and V the volume; the heat of a reaction, measured at constant pressure, is ΔH.
Synonym(s): heat (3) .
[G. enthalpō, to warm in]

enthalpy

the bond energy in a biochemical reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Total heat flux from the heated floor is the summation of radiant heat flux and convective heat flux from the surface, as given in Equation 9.
Calculation of total heat loss of the building (QI)
Calculated annually by EIA by adding the heat content of dry natural gas production and the total heat content of natural gas plant liquids production and dividing this sum by the total quantity of marketed (wet) natural gas production.
Thus, 16,848 BTU/hour is added to the total conduction losses to obtain total heat losses for the structure.
Simulation of a heat pump system for total heat recovery from flue gas.
The longer Konos has more output because it provides more frictional heating--70% of total heat input at the warranted output rate.
If this excess heat is used for evaporation, the total heat demand can be reduced by almost 15%.
Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the total heat content of natural gas received at electric utilities by the total quantity received at electric utilities.
A 90 kw total heat input is installed in Ni-chrome wire heating elements, with 30 kw per heating zone.
Thus, the first arrest temperature reveals that at this point, the total heat released per time unit (specific heat plus latent heat) is equal to the heat losses through radiation from the top surface and through conduction and convection from the walls of the test cup.

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