torture

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torture

Sexology
noun The infliction of extreme pain on a partner to enhance the sexual experience, usually understood to mean in the context of BDSM role-play.

verb To inflict extreme pain on a partner to enhance the sexual experience, usually understood to mean in the context of BDSM role-play.

torture

(tor′chŭr) [L. tortura, a twisting]
Infliction of severe mental or physical pain by various methods, usually for the purpose of coercion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim is not to stigmatize the torturers but to unveil the truth and establish the foundations of the rule of law, she emphasized.
In looking at the use of interrogational torture as a form of rhetoric that blurs boundaries between one's body and those of others--the torturer, the tortured and society at large--I suggest that torture creates new forms of consubstantiality and dissociation that mystify the division between the self and others.
The English version is 'For My Torturer, Lieutenant D ...' (translated by Anita Barrows, in Chipasula and Chipasula, 1995, p.
"One of the main reasons we asked was because one of our torturers is absolutely massive, about 6ft 5ins and I thought it would be great to see the two of them going face to face.
A native of Tindouf, the criminal in question has no ties with the Sahara, which he has never visited, Cherif said, adding that the torturer served in senior positions in the polisario administration taking advantage of family ties with the wife of the president of the imaginary republic,
Gallagher has further said that 'as all states are obliged to prosecute such torturers, Bush has good reason to be very worried.'
For Haritos-Fatouros "torture is generally not an aggressive act, although the torturer may occasionally lose his temper or act out of hatred" (162).
The memos that the Obama administration has disclosed teach us that anyone who complies with seemingly noble principles dictated by a "sense of duty" or by the necessary "defence of the homeland," or who is urged by a basic fear for his own life and welfare, or the lives and welfare of his kin, can become a torturer.
It is true that the techniques that Luban and Bowden refer to are less physically mutilating than beatings and burns, but our judgment of whether an act constitutes torture should not focus on whether it leaves physical scars or not, but on whether it causes extreme suffering, and whether the torturer's aim is to cause extreme suffering--to "turn its victim into someone who is isolated, overwhelmed, terrorized and humiliated." (17) What, then, are the effects of torture lite?
The disturbing appeal of Jack the Torturer reflects a wounded and frightened national psyche, a desire to lash out at those responsible for 9/11, and the frustration of a superpower unable to defeat a ragged band of terrorists.
Ironically, one former torturer proudly admitted to his actions in a 2001 book, causing such a backlash that he was punished, albeit lightly.
Can anyone become a torturer? Are certain societies more prone to use torture?