torsion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to torsion: torsion bar, Torsion of testis

torsion

 [tor´shun]
the act of twisting; the state of being twisted. adj., adj tor´sive.
Testicular torsion. From Copstead and Banasik, 2000.
tibial torsion inward twisting of the tibia so that the foot turns inward.

tor·sion

(tōr'shŭn),
1. A twisting or rotation of a part on its long axis or on its mesentery; often associated with compromise of the blood supply.
See also: intorsion, extorsion, dextrotorsion, levotorsion.
2. Twisting of the cut end of an artery to arrest hemorrhage.
See also: intorsion, extorsion, dextrotorsion, levotorsion.
3. Rotation of the eye around its anteroposterior axis.
See also: intorsion, extorsion, dextrotorsion, levotorsion.
[L. torsio, fr. torqueo, to twist]

torsion

/tor·sion/ (tor´-shun)
1. the act or process of being twisted or rotated about an axis.
2. a type of mechanical stress, whereby the external forces twist an object about its axis.
3. in ophthalmology, any rotation of the vertical corneal meridians.tor´sionaltor´sive

torsion

[tôr′shən]
Etymology: L, torquere, to twist
1 the process of twisting in a positive (clockwise) or negative (counterclockwise) direction.
2 the state of being turned.
3 (in dentistry) the twisting of a tooth on its long axis.

tor·sion

(tōr'shŭn)
1. A twisting or rotation of a part on its long axis.
2. Twisting of the cut end of an artery to arrest hemorrhage.
3. Rotation of the eye around its anteroposterior axis.
See also: intorsion, extorsion, dextrotorsion, levotorsion
[L. torsio, fr. torqueo, to twist]

torsion

Twisting or rotation, especially of a part that hangs loosely on a narrow support. Torsion may affect a loop of bowel or other organ and commonly results in dangerous obstruction to the blood supply of the part. Urgent surgical correction may be needed.

torsion

a phenomenon occurring in embryonic gastropods in which the visceral hump rotates through 180°.

Torsion

the action of twisting
Mentioned in: Ovarian Torsion

torsion

force applied to a body or object that deforms (or tends to deform) it in a 'twisting' manner. Also known as torsion load.

torsion

rotation of a part about its longitudinal axis

torsion,

n 1., motion or state of torque in which one end of an anatomical component is twisted about its longitudinal axis as the opposite end is either immobile or moves in the opposite direction.
2., any motion around an anteroposterior axis of the sphenobasilar synchondrosis that extends outside the normal range of motion.
torsion, forward,
n condition in which the sacrum rotates about an oblique axis so that sacral base side opposite to the axis involved glides anteriorly, producing a deep sulcus.
torsion, left-on-left (forward) sacral,
n condition in which left rotation of the sacrum occurs about a left oblique axis.
torsion, left-on-right (backward) sacral,
n condition in which left rotation occurs about a right oblique axis.
torsion, right-on-left (backward),
n condition in which right rotation occurs about a left oblique axis.
torsion, right-on-right (forward),
n condition in which right rotation occurs about a right oblique axis.
torsion, sacral (saˑ·krl tōrˑ·shn),
n 1., normal function of the sacrum, during walking and forward bending.
2., a dysfunctional condition of the sacrum, in which twisting between the hipbones and the sacrum occurs about a diagonal axis.
torsion, SBS,
n rotation of the occipital and sphenoid bones in opposing directions about an anteroposterior axis. May either be right or left, depending on which greater wing of the sphenoid bone is superior in position. Also called
sphenobasilar synchondrosis (symphysis) torsion.

torsion 

Rotation of an eye about an anteroposterior axis. If the upper pole of the vertical meridian of the cornea appears to rotate inward, it is called intorsion, and outward, extorsion. If the eye rotates to the right it may be called dextrotorsion and if it rotates to the left it may be called laevotorsion. It may occur as a result of a head tilt, extraocular muscle weakness or rotation of the eye to a tertiary position. Syn. cycloductin; cyclorotation; torsional movement. See Donder's law; tertiary position; incongruous hemianopia.

tor·sion

(tōr'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, twisting or rotation of tooth part on its long axis.
2. Twisting cut end of an artery to arrest hemorrhage.
[L. torsio, fr. torqueo, to twist]

torsion (tôr´shən),

n in dentistry the twisting of a tooth on its long axis. Also, the loading of a wire by twisting it along its long axis.
torsion, clasp,
n the twisting of the retentive clasp arm on its long axis. A retentive clasp may be formed so that it traverses a vertical distance before encircling the abutment to increase the torsion component of the clasp opening as compared with the flexure it experiences.

torsion

1. the act of twisting, e.g. of an artery in hemostasis.
2. the state of being twisted. For specific torsions see abomasal, cecal, colonic, gastric, liver, mesenteric, splenic, testicular, uterine.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the possibility of atypical (outward) testicular torsion should be always kept in mind.
2010) extended the SMMT to treat PC members under torsion.
Testicular torsion of a traumatic etiology is a rare, yet significant injury which, due to its rare occurrence and atypical patient presentation, may deter evaluating physicians from making an accurate diagnosis.
This study thus demonstrates that key clinical and imaging parameters can be combined into a model that can aid in the early diagnosis of adnexal torsion," Dr.
The incidence of testicular torsion is a urologic emergency which occurs in 1 out of 158 males by the age of 25.
The necessary and sufficient condition for the most dangerous order x harmonica to be prevented from creating vibratory torsion movements is for the proper pulse of the dynamic absorber to be equal to the pulses of the order x harmonica.
The torsion balance apparatus was first used by Cavendish in 1798 in a very simple form which permitted him to reach an unexpected accuracy.
The present study determined if a commercially available torsion adapter can reduce transtibial amputee joint torques when compared with a rigid adapter during straight-line walking and turning gait, as well as how both conditions compare with nonamputee gait.
He explains the action approach, including its relation to Maxwell's equation and Dirac fields, then examines continuous symmetries and conservation laws, magnetostatics, multivalued fields in superfluids and superconductors, magnetic monopoles, electric charge confinement, multivalued mapping from ideal crystals to crystals with defects, defect melting, relativistic mechanics in curvilinear coordinates, torsion and curvature from defects and embedding, mutivalued mapping, field equations of gravitation, fields of integer spin, particles with half-integer spins, covariant conservation gravitation of spinning matter as a gauge theory, evanescent properties of torsion in gravity, the teleparallel theory of gravitation embedding, and emerging gravity.
An equivalent of that over monoids for which torsion freeness implies U - (P) is given too.