torpid

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Related to torpidity: torpidly

torpid

 [tor´pid]
not acting with normal vigor and facility.

tor·pid

(tōr'pid),
Inactive; sluggish.
Synonym(s): torpent (1)
[L. torpidus, fr. torpeo, to be sluggish]

tor·pid

(tōr'pid)
Inactive; sluggish.
[L. torpidus, fr. torpeo, to be sluggish]
References in periodicals archive ?
This has created uniformity, insularity, risk- aversion, torpidity and often mediocrity."
He described Francis as the only stranger in his house and affirmed that he had "never had charge of a deranged person before." Doune was a curious house guest, described by Townsend as being "in a state of great torpidity both of mind and body; ...
A diligent, even obsessive, Catholic, Carlos, Hughes notes, was a man of unalterable habit and punctilious rigidity: "His favorite metaphor of political life was the clock, with its cogs and wheels tick-tocking along in a regulated, invariable pattern." Evenings at the court, Hughes tells us, "were said to induce a profound torpidity." The king's passion was aroused only by the hunt, in which he engaged whenever he possibly could.
The ending needs work, a video component should be jettisoned outright, and Michael Bigelow Dixon's production at times reflects the era's torpidity rather more than necessary.
The torpidity of this sick animated humaness is a figuration of the total energic flow of this world-body in which life-and-death are its metabolic (anabolic and katabolic) currents.
The World Cup and the world's most infamous metatarsal were history, a tournament of torpidity forgotten.
Their lives are an endless chain of moments of torpidity, but the pain of these soulless beings is so visibly real it is impossible to be bored.
(This torpidity in returning money is in sharp contrast to the practice of charging your credit card upon placing an order, even if an item will not be shipped for several more days, let alone delivered.) In a few cases, the refund still had not been credited when t he study went to press, more than six months after the item had been returned.
America had drifted toward a state of extreme torpidity, and Eisenhower's indifference was a major factor in this process.
Compton Burnett, again writing in 1895, the question was one of `rous[ing ...] from torpidity' the `delicate, backward, puny, and stunted children' of whom he writes, and although his technique is different (a quick dose of homoeopathic medicine is what they need) his aim is the same: to set them on the upward path to full development, and to prevent their lying `hopelessly fallow' (pp.