torcular herophili

torcular Herophili

 [tor´ku-ler he-rof´ĭ-le]
a depression in the occipital bone at the confluence of a number of cerebral venous sinuses.

tor·cu·lar he·roph·i·li

(tōr'kyū-lăr hĕ-rof'i-lī),
Archaic term for confluence of sinuses.
[L. wine-press of Herophilus, fr. torqueo, to twist]

torcular herophili

(tor′kū-lăr)
The confluence of cranial venous sinuses at the internal occipital protuberance of the skull.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Proximal transverse sinus for the purpose of study was defined as segment of sinus close to torcular herophili. Day JD et al [5] has described that a line drawn from the zygoma root to the inion reliably located the rostro caudal level of transverse sinus in all their specimens.
The tentorium and position of the torcular Herophili are elevated; i.e.
The patient underwent computed tomography (CT) scan of the head, which showed obstructive hydrocephalus and an aneurysmally dilated vein of Galen, a stenotic straight sinus, and a distended torcular Herophili. Prominence of the sulci and gyri were also evident (Fig.1a).
This included the prominent junction of sinuses named the lenos (wine vat) (Galen renamed it the torcular Herophili; however, this structure is rarely prominent in man, and the term could represent another example of animal anatomy corrupting knowledge of human anatomy).
Herophilus described the delicate arachnoid membranes, the cerebral ventricles, the venous sinuses especially the confluence of venous sinuses near the internal occipital protuberance (torcular Herophili), origin of nerves (he divided them into motor and sensory tracts) and differentiation of tendons from nerves (which were confusing at that time), the lacteals, coverings of the eye, liver, uterus, epididymis, amidst many other structures.
The concavity on the internal surface of the occipital bone, in which lodges the confluence of sinuses, was eponymously termed the torcular herophili, which is sometimes erroneously used to denote the confluence of sinuses itself.