toponym

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top·o·nym

(tōp'ō-nim),
A regional term; one designating a region as distinguished from the name of a structure, system, or organ.
[topo- + G. onyma, name]
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References in periodicals archive ?
One of the placename taxa I have documented during my toponymic adventuring is fishing ground names.
Stern speculates, "the addition to the names of the toponymic Sidon was probably meant to convey an assurance of quality by invoking associations with the city's fame, not only as a glass- making center but also as a glass- working center.
The production of linguistic landscapes thus operates as part of the symbolic construction of the public space, one that includes toponymic (ie, place naming) policies and strategies.
underscored in the discourse (charged with sensuality and mysticism), of the spatial setting (somewhere between toponymic specificity and an idealizing vagueness), of the time (.
In its final move, Scheyern Abbey itself was founded (40 kilometers northwest of Munich) between 1116 and 1119 at the toponymic hilltop residence of the dukes of Scheyern.
Africa in Antiquity: a linguistic and toponymic analysis of Ptolemy's map of Africa (1998 Saarbrucken), Appendix III.
68) Indeed, if the Greek "names" of Athens and the preceding dozen others lay toponymic claim to a "domain," they seemingly cannot "prevail" over a geopolitical reality whose imperial markings are inescapable (the "kiosk," "minaret" and "mosque" mentioned before).
The diversity of vernacular linguistic cartography, at times, managed to push through whatever standard form the notaries might have been developing, because the set of extant notarial site clauses includes every possible template and all manner of toponymic styles .
The toponymic perspective combined with the sociolinguistic approach allows us to investigate the language and toponym usage of Russian speakers in Helsinki.
I remember very clearly that, during my first reading of Jean Rolin's La Cloture, the facts about Marechal Ney interested me, but that it was during my second reading that I truly admired the way in which his toponymic imagination permeated his gaze, his stride, and his writing to make a battlefield (the one at Waterloo, it is said) out of the site he was considering.
William Sheehan and Maria Lane covered topics around the history of attempts to represent Mars on paper before the CCD and spaceflight era, noting the divide between those, exemplified by Schiaparelli, who approached the issue from a mapmaking and toponymic perspective, and those, represented by Nathaniel Green and Antoniadi, who approached it from a more naturalistic and artistic direction.
The principal technique to be used for this purpose is to proceed from a certain historical person or family of Scottish ancestry to available toponymic data after outlining a circle of Russian settlements with which the said individual or family might have had a connection.