topology

(redirected from topologists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to topologists: topology

to·pol·o·gy

(tō-pol'ŏ-jē),
1. Synonym(s): regional anatomy
2. The study of the dimensions of personality.
[topo- + G. logos, study]

topology

(tə-pŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. topolo·gies
1. Topographic study of a given place, especially the history of a region as indicated by its topography.
2. Medicine The anatomical structure of a specific area or part of the body.
3. Mathematics
a. The study of certain properties that do not change as geometric figures or spaces undergo continuous deformation. These properties include openness, nearness, connectedness, and continuity.
b. The underlying structure that gives rise to such properties for a given figure or space: The topology of a doughnut and a picture frame are equivalent.
4. Computers The arrangement in which the nodes of a network are connected to each other.

top′o·log′ic (tŏp′ə-lŏj′ĭk), top′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
top′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
to·pol′o·gist n.

topology

[təpol′əjē]
1 orientation of the presenting part of a fetus.
2 the study of special regions of anatomy.
3 the science of properties of geometric configuration.

topology

(tō-pŏl′ō-jē)
1. In obstetrics, the relationship of the presenting fetal part to the pelvic outlet.
2. In mathematics, the study of the relationships between objects that share a surface or a common border.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Euler characteristic, homology works best on shapes built up out of what topologists call simplices, namely, corner points, lines, polygons, and their higher-dimensional analogs--objects that are hard to visualize but can be precisely described using mathematical formulas.
Topologists classify the helicoid as a "complete embedded minimal surface of finite topology with infinite total curvature.
One early procedure was discovered in 1967 by Bernard Morin, a blind topologist at the Louis-Pasteur University in Strasbourg, France.
In lower dimensions, topologists can imagine a set of "ideal" shapes into which manifolds of a particular dimension can be transformed.
By studying the steps required to transform one shape into another, topologists establish relationships between different shapes and learn the key differences distinguishing one shape from another.
Topologists emphasize the properties of shapes that remain unchanged, no matter how much the shapes are stretched, twisted or molded so long as they aren't torn or cut.

Full browser ?