tophus


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Related to tophus: hyperuricemia, gout

tophus

 [to´fus] (L.)
1. a chalky deposit of sodium urate occurring in gout; tophi form most often around the joints in cartilage, bone, bursae, and subcutaneous tissue and in the external ear, producing a chronic, foreign-body inflammatory response.
2. dental calculus.
Tophus. Typical appearance of tophi, which are common in chronic gout, shown on an index finger. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2000.
tophus syphili´ticus syphilitic node.

to·phus

, pl.

to·phi

(tō'fŭs, tō'fī),
1.
2. A salivary calculus, or tartar.
Synonym(s): gouty pearl
[L. a calcareous deposit from springs, tufa]

tophus

/to·phus/ (to´fus) pl. to´phi   [L.] a deposit of sodium urate in the tissues about the joints in gout, producing a chronic, foreign-body inflammatory response.

tophus

(tō′fəs)
n. pl. to·phi (-fī)
1. A deposit of urates in the skin and tissue around a joint or in the external ear, occurring in gout. Also called chalkstone.
2. A concretion of mineral salts and organic matter deposited on the surface of the teeth.

tophus

[tō′fəs] pl. tophi
Etymology: L, tufa, porous rock
a calculus containing sodium urate that develops in fibrous tissue around joints, typically in patients with gout. -tophaceous, adj.
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Tophus

tophus

The pathognomonic lesion of gout, which appears grossly when preserved in alcohol or other non-aqueous solution as a nodular mass of white chalky, pasty material composed of crystalline and amorphous urates–eg, monosodium urate monohydrates, surrounded by mononuclear cells, fibroblasts and a foreign body-type giant cell reaction with epithelioid histiocytes. See Gouty toe.

to·phus

, pl. tophi (tō'fŭs, -fī)
1. See: gouty tophus
2. A salivary calculus, or tartar.
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TOPHI: Left and right hands of a patient with multiple deforming gouty tophi
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TOPHI: Left and right hands of a patient with multiple deforming gouty tophi

tophus

(to'fus) plural.tophi [L., porous stone]
A deposit of sodium biurate in tissues near a joint, in the ear, or elsewhere in individuals with gout.
Synonym: gouty pearl See: illustration

Tophus (plural, tophi)

A chalky deposit of a uric acid compound found in gout. Tophi occur most frequently around joints and in the external ear.
Mentioned in: Gout

gouty tophus

localized deposition of crystalline monosodium urate monohydrate in peripheral tissues (e.g. first metatarsophalangeal joint); subungual tophus formation causes nail dystrophy, with onychauxis and/or onycholysis

to·phus

, pl. tophi (tō'fŭs, -fī)
A salivary calculus or tartar.

tophus

pl. tophi [L.]
1. a chalky deposit of sodium urate occurring in gout; tophi form most often around the joints in cartilage, bone, bursae and subcutaneous tissue.
2. dental calculus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Law and coworkers (5) presented a patient who complained of anterior knee pain and limited ROM from 10[degrees] to 100[degrees] of flexion, who was found to have a single tophus in the patellofemoral compartment.
There is only one paper reporting a single intraosseous gouty tophus in the second metacarpal causing a pathologic fracture and simulating a malignancy.
Here again Joseph has a deformed left foot, with the abnormality located at the same place as the tophus in Martini's Nativity (Figure 4), and here again the artist's composition suggests that this deformity has some significance.
A large, erosive intraspinal and paravertebral gout tophus.
3,8) Furthermore, the proliferative synovitis that is seen in gouty arthritis may be accompanied by enhancement of a tophus, reflecting hypervascularity of the affected synovium.
If histopathology of a tophus or synovial biopsy suggests gout, fine-needle aspiration may be an alternative for crystal identification and subsequent definitive diagnosis.
Its 80 mg and 120 mg tablets are indicated for the treatment of chronic hyperuricaemia for conditions in which urate deposition has already occurred (including a history, or presence of, tophus and/or gouty arthritis).
The guidelines name the other indications for urate lowering in gout patients as the presence of a tophus on clinical examination or an imaging study, a history of two or more gout attacks per year, or a history of kidney stones.
A solitary tophus which is seen as a soft tissue mass without inflammatory joint disease can be confused with neoplastic conditions.
If gouty tophus involves soft tissue in the absence of articular disease, the tophi can be mistaken as a neoplastic lesionin However, one has to bear in mind other possible differentials such as tuberculosis, chronic rheumatoid arthritis (RA), amyloidosis, and pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS).
Dual energy CT (DECT) allows for identification of urate deposition in significantly more areas than physical exam and allows for automated volumetric assessment of total tophus volume load (Fig.