tooth wear


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tooth wear

(tūth wār)
Loss of tooth structure due to friction or abrasion).
See: wear
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(13) Maxillary expansion and 3D optical scanner; protraction Orapix; Orapix Co., Seoul, South Korea Duran (14) Molar distalization Dental scanner; Activity 850; Smart Optics, Bochum, Germany Kihara (16) Digital models 3D surface scanner; RexcanDS; Solutionix, Seoul, South Korea Park (20) Tooth wear Laser surface scanning system; KOD300, accuracy 50 mm, Orapix Co., Ltd., Seoul, South Korea Yook (28) Volume changes of lip Rexcan III 3D scanner; at bonding and debonding Solutionix Corp., Seoul, South Korea Dindaroglu (29) Lip position 3dMD Flex; 3dMD, Atlanta, GA, USA Dindaroglu (30) Smile reproducibility 3dMD; Flex System; 3dMD, Atlanta, GA, USA Deli (31) Soft tissue Five high-definition digital single-lens reflex cameras with flash; Canon 40D, 10 Mpx Kau et al.
"With the prevalence of erosive tooth wear increasing, it is vitally important that we address this preventable aspect of erosive tooth wear.
Testing the accuracy of classification trees and their combination with our tooth wear scheme
Ismail, "Prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year-old secondary school children in Kota Bharu Kelantan," Archives of Orofacial Sciences, vol.
Maureen Archer-Festa breaks down the issue of erosive tooth wear, particularly among children and teenagers age 5-19 years.
Frequent stops to check tooth wear can negatively affect production, but neglecting to proactively replace teeth can reduce productivity due to pocket replacement.
A study involving eighty specimens of maned wolf (63 skulls and 17 living animals) suggested that the most common oral diseases include tooth wear (83.7%) and tooth fracture (54.4%) [6], but unerupted teeth were not reported.
Thus, the length of radula will be affected by tooth wear, the time it takes to produce mature teeth, and production rate.
All of these properties make a critical difference in the life cycle of motorsport oil and scavaging pumps (which operate at extreme speeds) due to the importance of the gerotors regulating the fluid intake that results from thermal expansion and chemical absorption as this could have an effect on the amount of contact stress and result in localized tooth wear. By using the Meldin[R] 5330 plastic, motorsport companies have the confidence that their pumps are protected against pump inefficiency and low wear losses and also benefit from the following: