wing

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wing

(wing),
1. One of the vertebrate forelimbs adapted for flying, as in bats and birds.
2. Any appendage adapted for flying, as in insects.
3. Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala (1)
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

(wĭng)
n.
1. Any of various paired movable organs of flight, as that of a bird or insect.
2. Something that resembles a wing in appearance, function, or position relative to a main body.

wing

(wing) [TA]
1. The anterior appendage of a bird.
2. anatomy Ala (q.v.).
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

  1. either of the modified fore limbs of a bird that are covered with large feathers and specialized for flight in most species.
  2. one of the organs of flight of an insect, consisting of a membranous outgrowth from the thorax containing a network of veins.
  3. either of the organs of flight in certain other animals, especially the forelimb of a bat.

wing

(wing) [TA]
Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala.
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]
References in periodicals archive ?
After tending this new egg through hatching--some 10 days without a break--the famished surrogate mom took wing from the cliff for a meal.
The possibility of many more international flights - passenger and freight - arriving on Midland runways took wing yesterday.
But when proponents of the bill correctly claimed that "three strikes and you're out" would have prevented Polly Klaas' murder, the idea took wing across the country.
And although space didn't permit us to explore the countless intriguing details of the company's extraordinary retrospective, I'd be remiss if I failed to note that "Wakefern" is a loose portmanteau of its four founding founders' names - W for Louis Weiss, A for Al and Sam Aidekman, K for Abe Kesselman, an E added for pronunciation and Fern for Dave Fern - whose ambitious venture took wing in late 1946 with three more members at the urging of a solitary Del Monte Foods rep, who encouraged the disparate group of small Newark, N.J.-area grocers to band together and form a co-op to more effectively compete with the emergent industry giants of the day.
Lapwings and skylarks took wing when the waters came, but their young have probably perished.
To that end, paleontologists will keep searching for transitional fossils to help explain how birds first took wing.
Meanwhile, Kristol has unabashed visions of this period being like the Carter interregnum, when supply side economics took wing and gave the Reagan forces of 1980 an intellectual veneer.
The show opened in New York in 1921 and, the Stearnses write, "Negro musicals were in demand thereafter and dancing in musical comedy finally took wing." Katherine Dunham is given far less attention than she deserves, but in general Jazz Dance provides a detailed, loving history of a part of our dance heritage that until recently has been given far less than its due.
Your 'baby' wanted to spread his wings and if you wanted to see him fly, all you could do was wait on the ground as he took wing.
His research took wing in a forest just east of the town of Creel, Mexico, a popular madrone haunt.
Thiruvananthapuram: The globe-trotting character of Keralites was emphasised again on Sunday, when the state's fourth international airport took wings at Kannur.
The mission to paint the walls took wings and soon she put out a post on Facebook "which drew an overwhelming response from 1,500 people in just a matter of four to five days.