tonic

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tonic

 [ton´ik]
1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.

ton·ic

(ton'ik),
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a prolonged muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being; tonics are qualified, according to the organ or system on which they are presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nerve, uterine, general, etc.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

(tŏn′ĭk)
n.
a. An agent, such as a medication, that is supposed to restore or improve health or well-being.
b. A liquid preparation for the scalp or hair.
adj.
1. Restorative or stimulating to health or well-being.
2.
a. Physiology Of, relating to, or producing tone or tonicity in muscles or tissue: a tonic reflex.
b. Medicine Characterized by continuous tension or contraction of muscles: a tonic convulsion or spasm.

ton′i·cal·ly adv.
A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

tonic

Alternative medicine A medicinal preparation, usually of herbal origin–eg, ginseng, used in traditional Chinese and in ayurvedic medicine; tonics are said to be help build vital energy–qi. See Hoxsey tonic. Cf Bitter.

ton·ic

(ton'ik)
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being, qualified, according to the organ or system on which it is presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nervine, uterine, general, and others.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

1. Of continuous activity.
2. A mythical remedy commonly prescribed by doctors as a PLACEBO.
References in periodicals archive ?
This hyperthermia side effect was reproduced in several animal species (including mice; Figure 2) and results from decreased cutaneous heat loss and increased thermogenesis (46,47,63), suggesting that the TRPV1 channel is tonically active in vivo to regulate core temperature.
Spontaneous locomotor activity The TRPV1 channel tonically suppresses spontaneous locomotor activity.
This indicates that, while AngII binding to AT1 receptors inhibits tonically produced NO, binding to AT2 receptors stimulates it.
Second, when the valves of Mercenaria are closed, the lateral cilia are immobile, and the gills are tonically contracted, both longitudinally and dorsoventrally (Baker, pets.
In the second series of experiments, one cell in a pair was slightly depolarized so that it fired tonically at a frequency of between 0.25 and 1 Hz, and then the other neuron was depolarized so that it produced 5 s bursts.
Interestingly, an enhancement in tonically active glutamatergic inputs to the RVLM is reported to be responsible to hyperactivity of RVLM vasomotor neurons, high BP and sympathoexcitation in hypertension and heart failure [13, 14].
Based on these results, it is suggested that the enhancement of tonically active glutamatergic inputs to the RVLM plays an important role in the neuropathic pain associated with increase in BP and sympathetic nerve activity.
CAS activity typically occurred tonically, as relatively regular trains of single action potentials at 1 Hz or less.
This suggests that, if tonically prolonged, it might possibly lead to long lasting structural changes.
In addition to the islet-type of SG neuron, tonically firing neurons with central-type dendritic arbors are also likely GABAergic [32].
The existence of the [delta] subunit leads to receptor expression in the extrasynaptic membrane and the activation of these receptor results in the generation of "tonically" active currents [65-68].
In addition, opioid analgesics seem to disinhibit tonically active GABAergic neurons within the PAG [41], suggesting that an increase in the excitability of output PAG neurons produces analgesia.