tonic

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tonic

 [ton´ik]
1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.

ton·ic

(ton'ik),
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a prolonged muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being; tonics are qualified, according to the organ or system on which they are presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nerve, uterine, general, etc.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

/ton·ic/ (ton´ik)
1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.

tonic

(tŏn′ĭk)
n.
a. An agent, such as a medication, that is supposed to restore or improve health or well-being.
b. A liquid preparation for the scalp or hair.
adj.
1. Restorative or stimulating to health or well-being.
2.
a. Physiology Of, relating to, or producing tone or tonicity in muscles or tissue: a tonic reflex.
b. Medicine Characterized by continuous tension or contraction of muscles: a tonic convulsion or spasm.

ton′i·cal·ly adv.

tonic

[ton′ik]
pertaining to a type of afferent or sensory nerve receptor that responds to length changes placed on the noncontractile part of a muscle spindle. It may be triggered by a mechanical external force such as positioning or by an internal stretch caused by intrafusal muscle contraction.
A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

tonic

Alternative medicine A medicinal preparation, usually of herbal origin–eg, ginseng, used in traditional Chinese and in ayurvedic medicine; tonics are said to be help build vital energy–qi. See Hoxsey tonic. Cf Bitter.

ton·ic

(ton'ik)
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being, qualified, according to the organ or system on which it is presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nervine, uterine, general, and others.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

1. Of continuous activity.
2. A mythical remedy commonly prescribed by doctors as a PLACEBO.

tonic,

n treatment, usually an herbal concoction, that refreshes and restores health, energy, and vitality.

tonic

1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.
3. a patent medicine dedicated to the restoration of normal 'tone' to bodily functions generally. Usually a pharmaceutical rag-bag of stimulants, aromatics and alcohol, the paramount example of polypharmacy.

tonic-clonic
see clonic-tonic.
tonic convulsion
see tonic seizure.
tonic neck response
a postural reaction in which extension of the head and neck causes extension of the forelimbs in a normal dog or cat.
tonic seizure
see tonic seizure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quinine is added to tonic water because the drink was originally intended to be used as a prophylactic against malaria, but modern tonic water contains very low amounts--the FDA restricts it to 83 milligrams (mg) per liter, or approximately 20 mg per eight-ounce serving.
You can try tonic water, but most brands contain less than I percent of the amount in a typical therapeutic dose.
The history of tonic water begins in 17th, century Peru when
The researchers offered a group of women tastes of pineapple juice, tonic water, beer and diet cola -- then asked which drink they would order in a restaurant.
3) The waiter tells a helper to go and get the tonic water from the store.
Researchers at Washington University in Seattle have found that students who think they are drinking alcoholic beverages become more animated and aggressive, even if they've had only tonic water.
The bar should include such mixers as tonic water, club soda, ginger ale, tomato and orange juice.
Energy Club Soda, Energy Tonic Water, Energy Ginger Ale and Original Energy Flavor Now Available at Safeway Affiliated Stores Nationwide
INGREDIENTS Serves 8-10 100g butter 200g digestive biscuits For the filling 1 x 397g tin condensed milk 4 egg yolks (use the whites in the meringue below) Grated zest and juice of 4 unwaxed limes 3 tbsp gin For meringue topping 200g caster sugar 150ml tonic water 4 egg whites METHOD 1.
GIN AND TONIC LIME PIE INGREDIENTS Serves 8-10 100g butter 200g digestive biscuits For the filling 1 x 397g tin condensed milk 4 egg yolks (use the whites in the meringue below) Grated zest and juice of 4 unwaxed limes 3 tbsp gin For meringue topping 200g caster sugar 150ml tonic water 4 egg whites METHOD 1.
JUST THE TONIC GIN AND TONIC LIME PIE INGREDIENTS Serves 8-10 100g butter 200g digestive biscuits For the filling 1 x 397g tin condensed milk 4 egg yolks (use the whites in the meringue below) Grated zest and juice of 4 unwaxed limes 3 tbsp gin For meringue topping 200g caster sugar 150ml tonic water 4 egg whites METHOD 1.
I tried remedies including tonic water, massage, cold compresses and the prescription medications pramipexole and quinine to control the condition, but nothing seemed to help.