tonic


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Related to tonic: tonic seizure

tonic

 [ton´ik]
1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.

ton·ic

(ton'ik),
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a prolonged muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being; tonics are qualified, according to the organ or system on which they are presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nerve, uterine, general, etc.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

/ton·ic/ (ton´ik)
1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.

tonic

(tŏn′ĭk)
n.
a. An agent, such as a medication, that is supposed to restore or improve health or well-being.
b. A liquid preparation for the scalp or hair.
adj.
1. Restorative or stimulating to health or well-being.
2.
a. Physiology Of, relating to, or producing tone or tonicity in muscles or tissue: a tonic reflex.
b. Medicine Characterized by continuous tension or contraction of muscles: a tonic convulsion or spasm.

ton′i·cal·ly adv.

tonic

[ton′ik]
pertaining to a type of afferent or sensory nerve receptor that responds to length changes placed on the noncontractile part of a muscle spindle. It may be triggered by a mechanical external force such as positioning or by an internal stretch caused by intrafusal muscle contraction.
A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

tonic

Alternative medicine A medicinal preparation, usually of herbal origin–eg, ginseng, used in traditional Chinese and in ayurvedic medicine; tonics are said to be help build vital energy–qi. See Hoxsey tonic. Cf Bitter.

ton·ic

(ton'ik)
1. In a state of continuous unremitting action; denoting especially a muscular contraction.
2. Invigorating; increasing physical or mental tone or strength.
3. A remedy purported to restore enfeebled function and promote vigor and a sense of well-being, qualified, according to the organ or system on which it is presumed to act, as cardiac, digestive, hematic, vascular, nervine, uterine, general, and others.
[G. tonikos, fr. tonos, tone]

tonic

1. Of continuous activity.
2. A mythical remedy commonly prescribed by doctors as a PLACEBO.

tonic,

n treatment, usually an herbal concoction, that refreshes and restores health, energy, and vitality.

tonic

1. producing and restoring normal tone.
2. characterized by continuous tension.
3. a patent medicine dedicated to the restoration of normal 'tone' to bodily functions generally. Usually a pharmaceutical rag-bag of stimulants, aromatics and alcohol, the paramount example of polypharmacy.

tonic-clonic
see clonic-tonic.
tonic convulsion
see tonic seizure.
tonic neck response
a postural reaction in which extension of the head and neck causes extension of the forelimbs in a normal dog or cat.
tonic seizure
see tonic seizure.
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