tongueless


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to tongueless: tongueless frog

tongueless

(tŭng′lĭs)
adj.
1. Having no tongue.
2. Lacking the faculty of speech; mute.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The tongueless (cultivator) offers one advantage in requiring less room for turning," Davidson writes .
The sound of forest waters in the night, the rustling of cool corn-blades in the dark, the goat-cries of a boy into the wind, the pounding of great wheels upon a rail, the sound of quiet casual voices at a country station in the night, and the thorn of delight, the tongueless cry of ecstasy that trembles on the lips of the country kid as he lies awake for the first time in the night in the top berth of a Pullman car while the great wheels pound beneath him toward the city.
It is inexplicable that these friends, who know better than me that those who remain silent in the face of injustice are a tongueless devil, prefer silence to taking action against a defamation campaign and unjust acts.
Like the Irish criminal, Barton gradually senses the treacherousness of writing-confession and realizes that the corollary of the impossibility of rendering authentic her narrative has been the inescapable association of her story with Friday, the tongueless ex-servant of Cruso.
Summary: A 23-year-old woman, born tongueless, has received groundbreaking treatment in Brazil.
Where freedom freely strolls in fields yielding not to the rule of hardened heart, Prefers to be poor to being a tongueless tool, Where people love orphans more than their own children, Kindly tell me where it is: I want to meet those brothers.
Bowles' story has a cool, third-person narrator, while Camus' tale is an overheated dramatic monologue, narrated inside the head of a manic, tongueless man.
Besides battling giant bookworms, drooling echo beasts, and tongueless cave shamans, each familiar must grow in skill and bravery.
44) was one scholar who noted that a problem with English is it is, "a different tradition [that] leaves us [immigrants] tongueless and earless to this other world of meaning and significance" in comparison to the subtleties of language through which old indigenous meanings for place are constituted.
This is a time of connectedness with a primordial instinct that has the ability to bridge la rajadura (the split) between what Anzaldua calls "the tongueless magical eye and the loquacious rational eye" (45).
Hedrich Hirsch has shown how the poet in Angeline Weld Grimke's "The Closing Door" and "Blackness" "recalls the tongueless Philomela" and thus underscores her "songlessness" (459-60).