tone

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tone

 [tōn]
1. normal degree of vigor and tension; in muscle, the resistance to passive elongation or stretch; tonus.
2. a particular quality of sound or voice.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tone

(tōn),
1. A sound of distinct frequency.
2. The character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. The tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of the tissues; normal functioning of all the organs.
5. To perform toning.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tone

(tōn)
n.
1. The quality or character of sound.
2. The normal state of elastic tension or partial contraction in resting muscles.
3. Normal firmness of a tissue or an organ.
v.
To give tone or firmness to.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tone

Music therapy A musical sound Neurology The degree of tension in a muscle Psychology The nuance of a spoken phrase Sports medicine The baseline muscle tension, which usually reflects the amount of training. See Muscle tone.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tone

(tōn)
1. A musical sound.
2. The character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. The tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of the tissues; normal functioning of all the organs.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tone

The degree of tension maintained in a muscle when not actively contracting. In health, this is slight. Tone is abolished in certain forms of paralysis and greatly increased in others.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tone

(tōn)
1. Sound of distinct frequency.
2. Character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. Tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of tissues; normal functioning of all organs.
5. To perform toning.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the toneless morphemes /-di/ 'NM' and /=ga/ '3M.SBJ' are suffixed to the /H/ melody word /kuzar/ 'domestic pig', followed by the /LH/ verb /puba/ 'sick' and the toneless verbal clitic /=bo/.
As seen in (48a), prefix+stem words can have one drop from H to L ([??]), or they can be lexically toneless (48b):
For some time, Reeves thought her own illness was physically caused and was determined never to take psychiatric medication because of memories of her mother's "dead eyes and toneless voice." "For years, my mother was a zombie who ate, slept, and talked with her family using only two simple words--yes and no," she recalls.
Offred's paean to the lush effusions of Serena Joy's garden and to the memories of gardens past that it resurrects is arguably the novel's most vivid and certainly most lyrical passage, a sensuous, synesthetic experience of language in marked contrast to the "toneless metallic" iterations of the computerized Soul Scrolls, for example.
It was impossible to discern, in Powell's steely manner, ancestor-laden syntax, and fixed, expressionless gaze, whether he really believed in the nation that he described with his toneless incantations.
Langdon was wooden and toneless for much of the script and the page-turning passion of the book was replaced with boring sequences of long, tedious dialogue.
But in an age whose rhetorical models are marked by toneless colloquialism, therapeutic cliches, political correctness, and dumbed-down simplicity, finding a meaty, forceful idiom won't be easy.
The biggest shocks in Fitzgerald prove all the more shocking for being conveyed in a flat, toneless voice.
The general expectation of anything in religion that is not expressed by a toneless ritual or dull dirge is beyond them.
"Come down," he commands in a toneless voice; slowly she descends, with a crane shot from her point-of-view emphasizing both Parra's dominant position and his solitude (the black and white marble squares of the floor subtly suggesting as well the uncompromiseable political distinctions which separate the two).
A toneless second syllable in a compound word is unstressed: e.g.
"Do I know what I'm doing?" Brad repeated, in a heart-breakingly toneless, defeated voice.