tone


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Related to tone: muscle tone

tone

 [tōn]
1. normal degree of vigor and tension; in muscle, the resistance to passive elongation or stretch; tonus.
2. a particular quality of sound or voice.

tone

(tōn),
1. A sound of distinct frequency.
2. The character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. The tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of the tissues; normal functioning of all the organs.
5. To perform toning.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]

tone

(tōn)
n.
1. The quality or character of sound.
2. The normal state of elastic tension or partial contraction in resting muscles.
3. Normal firmness of a tissue or an organ.
v.
To give tone or firmness to.

tone

Music therapy A musical sound Neurology The degree of tension in a muscle Psychology The nuance of a spoken phrase Sports medicine The baseline muscle tension, which usually reflects the amount of training. See Muscle tone.

tone

(tōn)
1. A musical sound.
2. The character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. The tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of the tissues; normal functioning of all the organs.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]

tone

The degree of tension maintained in a muscle when not actively contracting. In health, this is slight. Tone is abolished in certain forms of paralysis and greatly increased in others.

tone

(tōn)
1. Sound of distinct frequency.
2. Character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. Tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of tissues; normal functioning of all organs.
5. To perform toning.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
References in classic literature ?
However, though she could see nothing but the soles of his feet, she was much relieved to hear that he was talking on in his usual tone. 'All kinds of fastness,' he repeated: 'but it was careless of him to put another man's helmet on--with the man in it, too.'
'Well, not the NEXT course,' the Knight said in a slow thoughtful tone: 'no, certainly not the next COURSE.'
"Don't, that's her name for me!" And Laurie put up his hand with a quick gesture to stop the words spoken in Jo's half-kind, half-reproachful tone. "Wait till you've tried it yourself," he added in a low voice, as he pulled up the grass by the handful.
"Goodbye, dear." And with these words, uttered in the tone she liked, Laurie left her, after a handshake almost painful in its heartiness.
"Do you know what the present is?" she asked, in lowered tones, speaking absently.
The sound that had disturbed her was the distant murmur of men's voices (apparently two in number) talking together in lowered tones, at the garden entrance to the conservatory.
"On what grounds?" inquired Manicamp, with his soft tone. "Will you do me the favor to explain this enigma to me?"
"I was saying, monsieur le comte," resumed Buckingham, in a tone of anger more marked than ever, although in some measure moderated by the presence of an equal, "I was saying that it is impossible these tents can remain where they are."
"'Tis very possible that he is right, madman as he is, Doctor Jacques," replied his comrade in the same low tone, and with a bitter smile.
"You see that he is mad," he said, in a low tone, to Gossip Tourangeau.
The whole evening Dolly was, as always, a little mocking in her tone to her husband, while Stepan Arkadyevitch was happy and cheerful, but not so as to seem as though, having been forgiven, he had forgotten his offense.
Have not names and tones been given unto things that man may refresh himself with them?