tomato effect

Rejection of an effective treatment for a disease for illogical reasons, as may occur when conventional logic dictates that a drug should have no therapeutic value or is toxic, as once occurred with colchicine, aspirin, and currently with thalidomide
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tomato effect

Clinical decision-making Rejection of an effective treatment for a disease for illogical reasons, as may occur when conventional logic dictates that a drug should have no therapeutic value or is toxic, as once occurred with colchicine, aspirin, and currently with thalidomide
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Tomato Effect" was first described in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1984.
"The Tomato Effect" is named for a period from the 1600s to early 1800s in America where tomatoes were considered poisonous and therefore unsafe to eat.
In today's world, we have an opposite problem that nonetheless can create a lethal "tomato effect" when it comes to rejecting lifesaving therapies.