tolerance

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tolerance

 [tol´er-ans]
1. the ability to bear something potentially difficult.
2. the ability to endure unusually large doses of a poison or toxin.
3. drug tolerance. adj., adj tol´erant.
acquired drug tolerance drug tolerance.
ambiguity tolerance the ability to withstand conflicting or complex situations without undue psychological stress.
drug tolerance a decreasing response to repeated constant doses of a drug or the need for increasing doses to maintain a constant response. See also drug dependence and habituation.
immunologic tolerance specific nonreactivity of lymphoid tissues to a particular antigen capable under other conditions of inducing immunity.
standing tolerance the amount of time an individual is capable of maintaining an erect, upright position.
tolerance test
1. an exercise test to determine the efficiency of the circulation.
2. a test to determine the body's ability to metabolize a substance or to endure administration of a drug.

tol·er·ance

(tol'ĕr-ăns),
1. The ability to endure or be less responsive to a stimulus, especially over a period of continued exposure.
2. The power of resisting the action of a poison or of taking a drug continuously or in large doses without injurious effects.
[L. tolero, pp. -atus, to endure]

tolerance

(tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
1.
a. Physiological resistance to a toxin.
b. Diminution in the physiological response to a drug that occurs after continued use, necessitating larger doses to produce a given response.
c. The ability to digest or metabolize a food, drug, or other substance or compound: glucose tolerance.
2.
a. Acceptance of a tissue graft or transplant without immunological rejection.
b. Unresponsiveness to an antigen that normally produces an immunologic reaction.
3. The ability of an organism to resist or survive infection by a parasitic or pathogenic organism.

tolerance

Immunology Immune unresponsiveness to an antigenic challenge. See Immune tolerance, Self-tolerance Pharmacology An ↑ in dose of a drug required to achieve the same effect in a particular Pt, which is a function of ↑ metabolism–eg, by hypertrophy of the endoplasmic reticulum or ↑ expulsion of the drug from a cell–eg, amplification of the multidrug resistant gene by malignant cells. See Oral tolerance, MDR Psychiatry Resistance to the effects of a sedative Substance abuse
1. A state caused by regular use of opioids, where an increased dose is needed to produce the desired effect; tolerance may be a predictable sequelae of opioid use and does not imply addiction. See Drug tolerance, Physical dependence.
2. The ability to 'hold liquor'–consume alcohol without overt signs of inebriation Vox populi A general term for a person's general 'mellowness,' which encompasses the ability to cope with stress, acceptance of others, complete with bumps and flaws, and other facets of social intelligence.

tol·er·ance

(tol'ĕr-ăns)
1. The ability to endure or be less responsive to a stimulus, especially over a period of continued exposure.
2. The power of resisting the action of a poison or of taking a drug continuously or in large doses without injurious effects.
[L. tolero, pp. -atus, to endure]

tolerance

  1. the ability of an organism to withstand harsh environmental pressures such as drought or extreme temperatures.
  2. the ability of an organism to withstand the build up of an adverse factor such as pesticides or endoparasites within itself without showing serious symptoms of attack.

Tolerance

A phenomenon whereby a drug user becomes physically accustomed to a particular dose of a substance, and requires increasing dosages in order to obtain the same effects.

tol·er·ance

(tol'ĕr-ăns)
1. Ability to endure or be less responsive to a stimulus, especially over a period of continued exposure.
2. Power of resisting the action of a poison or of taking a drug continuously or in large doses without harm.
[L. tolero, pp. -atus, to endure]

Patient discussion about tolerance

Q. When will I have the Glucose Tolerance Test? I am pregnant and wanted to know when I need to have the Glucose Tolerance Test and what is the test like.

A. The test is given between week 24 and week 28 of the pregnancy. First you drink glucose, which is very sweet. You can mix it will water to help it go down easier. Then, after an hour you will have a blood test to check your glucose levels.

Q. What Do my Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Results Mean? I had an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test last week. I am 26 weeks pregnant. The results I got are 132 mg/dL. What does this mean?

A. If your blood glucose level was greater than 130 mg/dL, your provider will likely recommend you take another diabetes screening test that requires you to fast (not eat anything) before the test. During this second test, called the 100-gram oral glucose tolerance test, your blood glucose level will be tested four times during a three-hour period after drinking the cola-like drink. If two out of the four blood tests are abnormal, you are considered to have gestational diabetes.

Q. I want to know the types of therapy to treat Bipolar Disorder. My aunty is suffering from Bipolar disorder. I couldn’t tolerate her suffering. So I want to know the types of therapy to treat this?

More discussions about tolerance
References in periodicals archive ?
Embed a uniform, agreed-upon risk tolerance level throughout the process.
* Which dowel rods immediately fall outside of an acceptable tolerance level and why?
"It is a pretty good clue that the seed companies can't manage what they are doing when they ask for a tolerance level," says Vetter.
At 100 dbA, the tolerance level per 24 hours is a maximum of two hours; at 115 dbA, it is just 15 minutes.
Conversely, plants with a low tolerance level should be strategically located farther away from these areas.
The agency will also reevaluate the negative influence of dioxins on human health following the World Health Organization's recent decision to lower its daily tolerance level.
Using data from the 1992 National Election Studies survey on white attitudes toward blacks, the authors separate whites by tolerance level. They do find, as one would expect, that there is strong opposition to affirmative action among the most bigoted whites.
Living in close quarters with others while performing seemingly constant and demanding duties can result in a decrease in one's tolerance level. You must be patient - with fellow staff members, campers, and yourself.
There is no tolerance level whatsoever, though, for one criminal act: resident abuse.
BAFS is likely to deleverage and return to within 2.0x, the tolerance level for its rating, in 2021 or after two full years of operation of this new pipeline.
by Dr Ajay NarayanThe advantage of using sedation is that the child is calm and has higher tolerance level for sitting through the procedure.
Psychologist Mark Rackley said that in a fast paced society, where people can buy things with a few clicks or swipes without having to wait, tolerance level for waiting in a queue would continue to decrease.