tolazamide


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tolazamide

 [tol-az´ah-mīd]
a sulfonylurea used as a hypoglycemic in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus whose blood glucose cannot be controlled by diet and exercise alone.

tolazamide

/tol·az·amide/ (tol-az´ah-mīd) a sulfonylurea used as a hypoglycemic in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

TOLAZamide

[tolaz′əmīd]
an oral sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of stable or type 2 diabetes and for some patients sensitive to other types of sulfonylureas or who have failed to respond to other similar drugs.
contraindications Unstable diabetes, serious impairment of renal, hepatic, or thyroid function, pregnancy, or known hypersensitivity to this drug or other sulfonylurea medications prohibits its use.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are hypoglycemia and skin reactions. Blood dyscrasias may occur.

tolazamide (tōlaz´əmīd),

n brand name: Tolinase;
drug class: sulfonylurea (first generation) oral antidiabetic;
action: causes functioning beta cells in pancreas to release insulin, leading to drop in blood glucose levels;
use: treatment of type II diabetes mellitus.

tolazamide

a first generation sulfonylurea derivative, used as a hypoglycemic agent in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.
References in periodicals archive ?
103) Use: flavor Use: pharmaceutical Class: carboxylate Class: factor Xa inhibitor 30 Tolazamide Pirinixic acid [1156-19-0] [50892-23-4] (score = 0.
The flush also occurs occasionally in those taking tolbutamide, acetohexamide and tolazamide, and it occurs rarely in those taking second generation agents.
There are no reports of SIADH for acetohexamide, tolazamide, glipizide or glyburide (which have mild diuretic effects).
These compounds include the first-generation agents such as chlorpropamide and tolazamide, and now the second-generation agents, glipizide and glyburide.
The study subjects were 55 consecutive patients with NIDDM, 50 men and 5 women, who manifested secondary failure to a first-generation sulfonylurea, ie, cholorpropamide or tolazamide, control during the 6 months between January and June 1992 while they were attending the diabetes clinic at the VA Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona.
Nineteen subjects were receiving chlorpropamide, and 36 subjects were treated with tolazamide before the change to a second-generation agent.
Finally, no significant alterations in these metabolic values were noted even when the glipizide and glyburide groups were further subdivided according to the specific first-generation drug used, ie, chlorpropamide in 19 subjects and tolazamide in 36 subjects.
The overall frequency of side effects for first-generation agents, however, ranges between 3% and 4% for tolbutamide, acetohexamide, and tolazamide, and 9% for chlorpropamide, as compared with a side-effects frequency of 6% to to 7% for both glyburide and glipizide.
The first generation of agents, which consists of tolbutamide, tolazamide, chlorpropamide, and acetohexamide, has been in clinical use for several decades.
All subjects were being treated with oral sulfonylurea agents in maximum daily recommended dosages, ie, tolazamide, 1000 mg (Tolinase, The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Mich); glyburide, 20 mg (DiaBeta, Hoechst-Roussel Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Somerville, NJ); and glipizide, 40 mg (Glucotrol, Roerig Division of Pfizer, Inc, New York, NY).