tissue tension


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tension

 [ten´shun]
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained; the degree to which something is stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, such as oxygen in blood.
5. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
6. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.
arterial tension blood pressure within an artery.
carbon dioxide tension the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood, noted as pCO2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
electric tension electromotive force.
intraocular tension intraocular pressure.
surface tension tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.

tis·sue ten·sion

a theoretic condition of equilibrium or balance between the tissues and cells whereby overaction of any part is restrained by the pull of the mass.

tis·sue ten·sion

(tish'ū ten'shŭn)
A theoretic condition of equilibrium or balance between the tissues and cells whereby overaction of any part is restrained by the pull of the mass.

tension

1. the act of stretching or the condition of being stretched or strained.
2. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, e.g. of oxygen in blood.
3. voltage.

arterial tension
blood pressure within an artery.
tension band wires
heavy gauge wire is inserted in fracture fragments and around pins placed in the fragments in order and adjusted to create compression on the fracture site. Suited for treatment of apophyseal or epiphyseal avulsion fractures. See also tension band plate.
intraocular tension
intraocular pressure; intraocular tension, normal intraocular tension being indicated by Tn, while T + 1, T + 2, etc. indicate increased tension, and T − 1, T − 2, etc. indicate decreased tension.
tension line
the direction of pull on the skin in any given region. A map of the body, drawn to show the various lines of pull, or tension, is useful in planning surgical closure of skin incisions, particularly ones with defects, in order to minimize forces that might cause dehiscence.
surface tension
tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension
a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.
References in periodicals archive ?
Method for soft tissue tension in reconstructive surgery of lower extremities", Journal of Surgery Jurnal Hirurgii], in Russian, Vol.
Instead, approaches that crank down the tension in PDAC tumors, perhaps by reducing Stat3 signaling, could provide a unique opportunity to reduce patient mortality particularly in patients with SMAD4 mutations by interrupting the positive feedback loop of tissue tension and significantly improve the prognosis for these patients.
I critically assess any new energy-based device for its ergonomic handedness, propensity for sticking to tissue and production of plume, ability to manipulate and dissect tissue, efficiency in desiccated or fatty tissues, discoloration of tissue by carbon, response to tissue tension, and reliability for hemostasis.
These devices perform best when tissue tension is reduced to maximize vessel sealing.
The intended purpose of this treatment was to decrease tissue tension as well as to normalize tissue function.
It is the goal of ART[R] to remove these "adhesions" thereby decreasing tissue tension, and thus stopping the cumulative injury cycle.
The former makes it possible to maintain visualization throughout the procedure, obtain adequate exposure, and control tissue tension.