tissue tension


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tension

 [ten´shun]
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained; the degree to which something is stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, such as oxygen in blood.
5. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
6. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.
arterial tension blood pressure within an artery.
carbon dioxide tension the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood, noted as pCO2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
electric tension electromotive force.
intraocular tension intraocular pressure.
surface tension tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tis·sue ten·sion

a theoretic condition of equilibrium or balance between the tissues and cells whereby overaction of any part is restrained by the pull of the mass.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tis·sue ten·sion

(tish'ū ten'shŭn)
A theoretic condition of equilibrium or balance between the tissues and cells whereby overaction of any part is restrained by the pull of the mass.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be a single-step operation or as the result of the controlled tissue tension.
Plastic surgery with the controlled tissue tension was performed in 30 cases (8.4%).
I critically assess any new energy-based device for its ergonomic handedness, propensity for sticking to tissue and production of plume, ability to manipulate and dissect tissue, efficiency in desiccated or fatty tissues, discoloration of tissue by carbon, response to tissue tension, and reliability for hemostasis.
These devices perform best when tissue tension is reduced to maximize vessel sealing.
Palpable tissue tension was discovered in the complex of the tensor fascia latae, iliotibial band, lateral aspect of gluteus maximus, as well as the fascia latae along the lateral aspect of the right femur.
The intended purpose of this treatment was to decrease tissue tension as well as to normalize tissue function.
To ensure hemostasis when using the ultrasonic shears, relax tissue tension and activate the device using minimum power.
At end inspiration, presumably the most risky point in the tidal cycle, the difference between the plateau pressure and esophageal pressure gives an indication of tissue tensions within the lung, but clearly these are not everywhere equal.