perfusion

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Related to tissue perfusion: ineffective tissue perfusion

perfusion

 [per-fu´zhun]
1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.
tissue perfusion the circulation of blood through the vascular bed of tissue.
ineffective tissue perfusion (specify type) (renal, cerebral, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, peripheral) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has a decrease in oxygen resulting in failure to nourish the tissues at the capillary level.

per·fu·sion

(per-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

/per·fu·sion/ (-zhun)
1. the act of pouring over or through, especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured over or through an organ or tissue.

luxury perfusion  abnormally increased flow of blood to an area of the brain, leading to swelling.

perfusion

(pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.

perfusion

[pərfyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, perfundere, to pour over
1 the passage of a fluid through a specific organ or an area of the body.
2 a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

Bathing an organ or tissue with a fluid. See Arterial perfusion, Hyperthermic perfusion, Isolated hepatic perfusion, Limb perfusion, Myocardial perfusion Oncology A technique used for a melanoma of an arm or leg; circulation to and from the limb is stopped with a tourniquet; chemotherapy is put directly into the circulation to ↑ regional drug dose Transplantation The intravascular irrigation of an isolated organ with blood, plasma or physiologic substance, to either studying its metabolism or physiology under 'normal' conditions or for maintaining the organ as 'fresh' as possible, while transporting donated organs to recipients. See Slush preparation.

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

1. The passage of blood or other fluids through the body.
2. The effectiveness with which a part, such as the brain, is supplied with blood.

perfusion

the passage of a liquid through an organ or tissue.

Perfusion

The passage of fluid (such as blood) through a specific organ or area of the body (such as the heart).
Mentioned in: Shock, Thallium Heart Scan

perfusion

in physiology and pathology, refers to blood flow in a region, organ or tissue; hypoperfusion inadequate blood flow.

perfusion

passage of blood and tissue fluid through the capillary bed

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
Flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue.

perfusion (pərfūzhən),

n a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.

perfusion pressure
the gradient between arterial blood pressure and venous pressure in a comparable location in the vascular tree.
pulmonary perfusion
blood flow through the pulmonary capillaries.
renal perfusion
the rate of perfusion in the kidney is much higher than in any other organ. The rate of formation of urine depends to a large extent on the perfusion rate.
perfusion scan
using pulmonary scintigraphy, radionucleotide agents injected into a peripheral vein can be detected where it is trapped in the pulmonary capillary bed. Used to assess pulmonary blood flow.
perfusion technique
maintenance of blood circulation to tissues during cardiopulmonary bypass.
perfusion:ventilation ratio
see ventilation: perfusion ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inadequate tissue perfusion (shock) should be recognised early in young children presenting with acute illness.
To overcome this problem, the present study used the measurement of subcutaneous tissue perfusion and S[O.
Until recently, assessment of tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery has been elusive.
Moreover, functional CT has been shown to be superior to conventional imaging in the early detection and differentiation of ischemic lesions because it enables the quantification of changes in tissue perfusion, which occurs earlier than structural changes do.
The Dolphin technology continually adjusts to the patient's body, promoting tissue perfusion and oxygenation, and minimizing injury related to compromised blood flow.
Used to support patients whose native or pharmacologically-assisted cardiac output is unable to meet the body's tissue perfusion needs, Arrow's balloon pump consoles offer full automaticity of the most critical functions, responding to changes in patient conditions to maintain the desired level of hemodynamic support.
17th Part - Measurement of tissue perfusion and metabolism;
This concept of monitoring tissue perfusion is not new to the market, however T-Stat's successful and patented VLS white light technology is.
The study's investigators believe that these biologic effects, combined with increased tissue perfusion, contribute to the ability of dermaPACE([R]) to heal these clinically challenging diabetic foot ulcers.
Second Part - Measurement of tissue perfusion and metabolism;
Effective training is essential to: understanding how StO2 differs from traditional vital signs; and, accurately interpreting InSpectra StO2 Measurements for early detection of inadequate tissue perfusion.
The CerOx 3210F is currently the only device to use a single, non-invasive probe for simultaneously and independently measuring both oximetry and blood flow parameters, together providing a clear indication of tissue perfusion.