tissue forceps


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Related to tissue forceps: dressing forceps, thumb forceps

forceps

 [for´seps] (L.)
a two-bladed instrument with a handle, used for compressing or grasping tissues in surgical operations, handling sterile dressings, and other purposes.
alligator forceps a grasping forceps with a scissorlike handle and blades opening in a vertical plane similar to the jaws of an alligator.
bayonet forceps a forceps whose blades are offset from the axis of the handle.
capsule forceps a forceps for removing the lens capsule in cataract.
Chamberlen forceps the original form of obstetric forceps, invented in the sixteenth century.
clamp forceps a forceps-like clamp with an automatic lock, for compressing arteries or other structures.
dressing forceps forceps with scissor-like handles for grasping lint, drainage tubes, etc., in dressing wounds.
Magill forceps forceps used to introduce an endotracheal tube into the trachea during nasotracheal intubation.
obstetric forceps forceps for extracting the fetal head from the maternal passages.
Obstetric forceps and their application. From McKinney et al., 2000.
rongeur forceps a forceps designed for use in cutting bone.
thumb forceps a forceps with serrated blades and with or without teeth.
tissue forceps a forceps without teeth or with one or more small teeth at the end of each blade, designed for handling tissues with minimal trauma during surgery.

tissue forceps

tissue forceps

A pincer-like toothed forceps for grasping delicate tissues.
See also: forceps

forceps

pl. forcipes [L.] a two-bladed instrument with a handle for compressing or grasping tissues in surgical operations, and for handling sterile dressings, etc.

alligator forceps
strong toothed forceps having a double clamp. Long-handled with short jaws at the end of a long shank. Designed for grasping in an enclosed space, e.g. removing grass seeds from ear canals.
bayonet forceps
a forceps whose blades are offset from the axis of the handle.
bone-cutting forceps
have cutting blades and may be double-action.
bone-holding forceps
designed to grip bones or fragments.
capsule forceps
a forceps for removing the lens capsule in cataract.
clamp forceps
a forceps-like clamp with an automatic lock, for compressing arteries, etc.
dressing forceps
finger- and thumb-operated spring forceps used for general grasping of tissues, dressings; there is a great variety of tips available to the blades. Called also thumb forceps.
grasping forceps
includes tissue, sponge, towel, vulsellum forceps.
hemostatic forceps
used to clamp the ends of vessels and establish hemostasis or to cross clamp a vascular pedicle. See also crile hemostatic forceps, halsted mosquito forceps, kelly-murphy forceps, rochester-carmalt forceps.
obstetric forceps
forceps for extracting the fetal head from the maternal passages.
rongeur forceps
a forceps designed for use in cutting bone.
sponge forceps
thumb forceps
for holding tissue with the left hand while using another instrument in the right hand (or vice versa for the sinistral surgeon). Called also tissue forceps.
tissue forceps
includes adson tissue forceps, alligator forceps (see above), allis tissue forceps, babcock forceps, knowles forceps, rightangle forceps, vulsella.
towel forceps
spring clips with middle crossover and spring at end. Inward curving, sharp pointed tips. Used to fix drapes to tissue with minimal trauma. Also usable as light tissue forceps or rib approximators in small animals.
transfer forceps
a sterile grasping instrument, used to move surgical instruments, blades, needles and suture material to the instrument table at surgery.
References in classic literature ?
He came in here,' said the waiter, looking at the light through the tumbler, 'ordered a glass of this ale - WOULD order it - I told him not - drank it, and fell dead.
Disorder, the remains of dinner, a broken wine-glass on the floor, spilt wine, cigarette ends, fumes of drink and delirium in my brain, an agonising misery in my heart and finally the waiter, who had seen and heard all and was looking inquisitively into my face.
If people spoke distinct,' said the waiter, 'there wouldn't be half the trouble there is in the world.
He had now finished his breakfast; but he was drinking a small cup of coffee, which had been served to him on a little table in the garden by one of the waiters who looked like an attache.
That's the only thing I miss in Paris," he said, as he finished the bock which the waiter had brought.
In company with our other Hampton students, I secured a place as a table waiter in a summer hotel in Connecticut, and managed to borrow enough money with which to get there.
The game continued; a waiter kept handing round champagne.
But what she most resented was the waiter with his swagger black suit and short quick steps and the 'towel' over his arm.
They were the family of William, one of our club waiters who had been disappointing me grievously of late.
A waiter paused before their table and offered a salver on which were several cups of coffee and liqueur glasses.
I bet you, right now, I can order two beers, loud so he can hear and notice, and then whisper to the waiter to bring one, an', when the one comes, Killeny Boy'll raise a roar with the waiter.
The waiter added, that I could book a place--conditionally--by either of these vehicles; and that, as they were always well-filled, I had better be quick in making my choice between them.